27 abril 2017

On the Need for (At Least) Five Classes of Macro Models

On the Need for (At Least) Five Classes of Macro Models


April 10, 2017 3:00 PM

One of the best pieces of advice Rudi Dornbusch gave me was: Never talk about methodology. Just do it. Yet, I shall disobey and take the plunge.
The reason and the background for this blog is a project started by David Vines about DSGEs, how they performed in the crisis, and how they could be improved.[1] Needled by his opinions, I wrote a PIIE Policy Brief. Then, in answer to the comments to the brief, I wrote a PIIE RealTime blog. And yet a third, another blog, each time hopefully a little wiser. I thought I was done, but David organized a one-day conference on the topic, from which I learned a lot and which has led me to write my final (?) piece on the topic.

This piece has a simple theme: We need different types of macro models. One type is not better than the other. They are all needed, and indeed they should all interact. Such remarks would be trivial and superfluous if that proposition were widely accepted, and there were no wars of religion. But it is not, and there are.

Here is my attempt at typology, distinguishing between five types. (I limit myself to general equilibrium models. Much of macro must, however, be about building the individual pieces, constructing partial equilibrium models, and examining the corresponding empirical micro and macro evidence, pieces on which the general equilibrium models must then build.) In doing so, I shall, with apologies, repeat some of what was in the previous blogs.

Foundational models. The purpose of these models is to make a deep theoretical point, likely of relevance to nearly any macro model, but not pretending to capture reality closely. I would put here the consumption-loan model of Paul Samuelson, the overlapping generations model of Peter Diamond, the equity premium model of Ed Prescott, the search models of Diamond, Mortensen, and Pissarides, and the models of money by Neil Wallace or Randy Wright (Randy deserves to be here, but the reason I list him is that he was one of the participants at the Vines conference. I learned from him that what feels like micro-foundations to one economist feels like total ad-hocery to another…) .

DSGE models. The purpose of these models is to explore the macro implications of distortions or set of distortions. To allow for a productive discussion, they must be built around a largely agreed upon common core, with each model then exploring additional distortions, be it bounded rationality, asymmetric information, different forms of heterogeneity, etc. (At the conference, Ricardo Reis had a nice list of extensions that one would want to see in a DSGE model).
These were the models David Vines (and many others) was criticizing when he started his project, and, in their current incarnation, they raise two issues:
The first is what the core model should be. The current core, roughly an RBC (real business cycle) structure with one main distortion, nominal rigidities, seems too much at odds with reality to be the best starting point. Both the Euler equation for consumers and the pricing equation for price-setters seem to imply, in combination with rational expectations, much too forward lookingness on the part of economic agents. My sense is that the core model must have nominal rigidities, bounded rationality and limited horizons, incomplete markets and the role of debt. I, and many others, have discussed these issues elsewhere, and I shall not return to them here. (I learned at the conference that some economists, those working with agent-based models, reject this approach altogether. If their view of the world is correct, and network interactions are of the essence, they may be right. But they have not provided an alternative core from which to start.[2] )
The second issue is how close these models should be to reality. My view is that they should obviously aim to be close, but not through ad-hoc additions and repairs, such as arbitrary and undocumented higher-order costs introduced only to deliver more realistic lag structures. Fitting reality closely should be left to the next category I examine, i.e., policy models.

Policy models. (Simon Wren-Lewis prefers to call them structural econometric models.) The purpose of these models is to help design policy, to study the dynamic effects of specific shocks, to allow for the exploration of alternative policies. If China slows down, what will be the effect on Latin America? If the Trump administration embarks on a fiscal expansion, what will be the effects on other countries?
For these models, fitting the data and capturing actual dynamics is clearly essential. But so is having enough theoretical structure that the model can be used to trace the effects of shocks and policies. The twin goals imply that the theoretical structure must by necessity be looser than for DSGEs: Aggregation and heterogeneity lead to more complex aggregate dynamics than a tight theoretical model can hope to capture. Old fashioned policy models started from theory as motivation and then let the data speak, equation by equation. Some new-fashioned models start from a DSGE structure and then let the data determine the richer dynamics. One of the main models used at the Federal Reserve, the FRB/US model, uses theory to restrict long-run relations and then allows for potentially high-order costs of adjustment to fit the dynamics of the data. I am skeptical that this is the best approach, as I do not see what is gained, theoretically or empirically, by constraining dynamics in this way.
In any case, for this class of models, the rules of the game must be different than for DSGEs. Does the model fit well, for example, in the sense of being consistent with the dynamics of a VAR characterization? Does it capture well the effects of past policies? Does it allow one to think about alternative policies?

Toy models. Here, I have in mind models such as the many variations on the IS-LM model, the Mundell-Fleming model, the RBC model, and the New Keynesian model. As my list indicates, some may be only loosely based on theory, others more explicitly so. But they have the same purpose. Allow for a quick first pass at some question, or present the essence of the answer from a more complicated model or class of models. For the researcher, they may come before writing a more elaborate model or after, once the elaborate model has been worked out and its entrails examined.
How close to formal theory these models remain is just not a relevant criterion here. In the right hands, and here I think of master craftsmen such as Robert Mundell or Rudi Dornbusch, they can be illuminating. There is a reason why they dominate undergraduate macroeconomics textbooks: They work as pedagogical devices. They are art as much science, and not all economists are gifted artists. But art is of much value. (The nature of art has changed somewhat. In the old days, the fact that paper is two-dimensional forced one to write models with two equations, or sometimes, with a lot of ingenuity and short cuts, models with three equations. The ease of use of MATLAB and Dynare have made it easier to characterize and convey the characteristics of slightly larger models.)

Forecasting models. The purpose of these models is straightforward: Give the best forecasts. And this is the only criterion by which to judge them. If theory is useful in improving the forecasts, then theory should be used. If it is not, it should be ignored. My reading of the evidence is the verdict is out on how much theory helps. The issues are then statistical, from how to deal with over-parameterization to how to deal with the instability of the underlying relations, etc.
In sum: We need different models for different tasks. The attempts of some of these models to do more than what they were designed for seem to be overambitious. I am not optimistic that DSGEs will be good policy models unless they become much looser about constraints from theory. I am willing to see them used for forecasting, but I am again skeptical that they will win that game. This being said, the different classes of models have a lot to learn from each other and would benefit from more interactions. Old fashioned policy models would benefit from the work on heterogeneity, liquidity constraints, embodied in some DSGEs. And, to repeat a point made at the beginning, all models should be built on solid partial equilibrium foundations and empirical evidence.

Notes

[1] The outcome of this project will be a number of articles, to be published in a Special Issue of the Oxford Review of Economic Policy (link is external) with the title "Rebuilding the Core of Macroeconomic Theory."
[2] A semantic issue: While I believe that this class of models must indeed be dynamic, stochastic, and general equilibrium, the acronym DSGE is widely seen as referring to a specific class of models, namely RBC-based models with distortions. Agent-based modelers would argue that this is not the only approach within that class.

https://piie.com/blogs/realtime-economic-issues-watch/need-least-five-classes-macro-models

¿Está la macroeconomía tan enferma? Javier Ferri

¿Está la macroeconomía tan enferma?
Javier Ferri

Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them,
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

En las última semanas Nada es Gratis se ha hecho eco de un debate vivo pero con mucha aristas sobre el estado actual de la economía, su capacidad real para mejorar nuestro conocimiento de los problemas económicos y proponer soluciones, el mejor método para aproximarse a estos problemas, o los peligros de que algunas enfermedades económicas se extiendan en el futuro. Aspectos relacionados se han tocado en las entradas de Santiago Sánchez-Pagés (aquí), Libetad González (aquí), Marcel Jansen y Pedro Rey Biel (aquí), y Juan Francisco Jimeno (aquí). La suma de las versiones más negativas del debate dibujarían un páramo infestado de muertos vivientes, economistas sin vida y sin alma que han perecido atragantados con alguna de las ecuaciones de sus modelos inútiles o, peor aún, por la mordedura de uno de esos zombis que controlan los instrumentos de los que se sirve el mainstream para difundir su podredumbre.
Y si en medio de ese campo desolado existe un lugar en el que la degradación se ha extendido en grado sumo, ese sitio se llama macroeconomía, absolutamente desenfocada en sus propósitos, ajena a la realidad que pretende explicar, e incapaz de garantizar un mínimo de confianza en sus predicciones. Tierra de disputas y de luchas intestinas entre los propios muertos.
Aunque deliberadamente tremendista, la imagen proyectada por esta introducción no está tan alejada de la que han querido trasladar una parte de los participantes en el debate sobre el estado de la macroeconomía. La sombra espesa de la Gran Recesión escondía también el vuelo exterminador de los Nazgûl, poderosos espectros alados que desde las tierras de Mordor anunciaban con sus gritos el fin de los DSGE (véase, por ejemplo, la nota de Paul Krugman al respecto y la respuesta de John Cochrane).
El Washington Post acaba de publicar en su blog Monkey Cage un artículo del politólogo Henry Farrell con el cariñoso título “Los economistas están discutiendo sobre cómo su profesión se arruinó durante la Gran Recesión. Esto es lo que sucedió”.  Pese a lo que el título promete, el contenido de la nota es bastante decepcionante, pues no explica cómo los economistas hemos acabado vagando por un patatal metodológico, la camisa hecha unos zorros, la mirada extraviada y emitiendo sonidos guturales que nadie entiende. Más bien lo que el artículo hace es tratar de identificar la influencia real que los macroeconomistas ejercieron en las políticas de austeridad. Su conclusión es que salvo en circunstancias excepcionales (cuando los economistas hablan con una sola voz) no son los economistas los que influyen sobre los políticos, sino que son los actores de la política económica los que influyen sobre un conjunto seleccionado de economistas, que se convierten en los mensajeros de sus intereses, en una simbiosis en la que ganan las dos partes.
Esta explicación sociológica, que se podría generalizar diciendo que hay economistas que tienen su público, al que sirven y del que se sirven, estaría detrás, según Farrell, del encumbramiento y publicidad por el poder de trabajos como los de Alberto Alesina, firme defensor de la austeridad. Imaginemos que aceptamos esta hipótesis. Por la misma razón, podríamos añadir, las opiniones y juicios de valor de otros grandes economistas, bien identificados, tendrían su propio público en otra parte del espectro político, cuyos intereses defenderían con sus argumentos y de cuya publicidad también se aprovecharían. Desde esta perspectiva, y sobre el terreno de las opiniones y juicios de valor, no podríamos hablar de buenos y malos economistas por su exposición a los intereses políticos, y esto sería así incluso en la liga de los grandes economistas.
¿Qué le pasa a la macroeconomía? ¿De verdad está tan enferma? ¿Necesita una sangría para olvidar lo aprendido en las últimas décadas y empezar de nuevo? ¿Deberían los macroeconomistas dejar de relacionarse con el mundo de la política y centrarse en la espiritualidad de los modelos puros? ¿Qué tipo de modelos macroeconómicos queremos para el futuro? ¿Necesitamos más contadores de fábulas o más malabaristas de los números?

Voy a darles dos buenas noticias y una mala. La primera buena noticia es que voy a responder a estas cuestiones. La segunda es que lo voy a hacer utilizando los argumentos de unos ensayos/notas recientes de Ricardo Reis y Olivier Blanchard, dos economistas de generaciones distintas y reconocido prestigio, uno que acaba de entrar en el debate y otro que lleva años en él, pero que comparten una visión positiva del futuro de la macroeconomía, y ofrecen soluciones no excluyentes. La mala noticia es que esta entrada será un poco más extensa de lo habitual.

Ricardo Reis en el ensayo que ha inspirado el título de esta entrada, Is something really wrong with macroeconomics? empieza reconociendo que hay infinidad de aspectos en la macroeconomía que están mal. Si aceptáramos que todo está bien, seguir investigando no tendría sentido, ni en macroeconomía ni en ningún área o disciplina de las ciencias sociales o naturales. Los investigadores son precisamente expertos en identificar dónde el estado del conocimiento se queda corto, o directamente falla para explicar la realidad, e intentar rellenar el hueco. A partir de aquí, el mérito de Reis (y Blanchard) es saber separarse de la natural tendencia de los participantes en el debate a proponer direcciones de mejora que, de modo nada sorprendente, coinciden con lo que cada uno mejor sabe hacer. En palabras de Reis: “my goal is not to claim that there is not disease, but rather to evaluate existing diagnoses, so that changes and progress are made in a productive direction” (p. 2).

Sobre la enfermedad de la macroeconomía

La caricatura que se traslada del state of the art en macroeconomía es la siguiente: en los modelos, que son súper abstractos, sólo existen los agentes representativos y las expectativas con previsión perfecta, se desprecian las cuestiones de desigualdad, se obvia la relevancia de los mercados financieros, los contratos hipotecarios, el papel de la vivienda o los bancos, se ignoran las cuestiones de identificación y jamás se baja al nivel de los datos microeconómicos.
Para analizar el alcance real de estas críticas Reis primero observa a qué dedican los jóvenes macroeconomistas más brillantes sus esfuerzos investigadores. Los editores de la Review of Economic Studies seleccionan cada año a seis jóvenes economistas a los que invitan a hacer un tour por algunas instituciones europeas y presentar su job market paper. El jurado es heterogéneo y cambia cada año, por lo que se reduce el sesgo de selección. El trabajo de los ocho jóvenes macroeconomistas seleccionados en los últimos años (con tesis en Northwestern, MIT, Chicago, Penn, NYU, Berkeley y Yale) ofrece una muestra de los derroteros que la macroeconomía moderna está tomando hoy en día. Lo que se observa es una mezcla de teoría y evidencia, de datos agregados y microdatos, de innovaciones metodológicas y preguntas relevantes desde el punto de vista de la política económica.
La muestra anterior de jóvenes promesas en macroeconomía es reducida y elitista por lo que Reis presenta evidencia adicional a partir de los artículos publicados en el último número del Journal of Monetary Economics, una de las revistas punteras de macroeconomía, donde se puede encontrar toda una diversidad de trabajos macroeconómicos, originales y alejados de los estereotipos utilizados por los críticos en sus ataques. Más aún, si la macroeconomía estuviera en crisis, las mejores revistas publicarían lentamente menos artículos de macroeconomía y las grandes universidades ofrecerían paulatinamente menos puestos para macroeconomistas. Sobre lo segundo Reis encuentra que el porcentaje de vacantes para macroeconomistas se ha mantenido constante a lo largo de los últimos 15 años. En cuanto a lo primero, las cifras muestran que el porcentaje de trabajos macro publicados en las revistas oficiales de las asociaciones de economía americana y europea, el AER y el JEEA (a las que se añade el NBER para tener una imagen más inmediata de la investigación) han crecido a un ritmo constante desde el año 2000, y que los artículos de macro financiera (esa cosa que según los críticos no existe) han crecido todavía más, incluso en los siete años anteriores a la crisis.
La imagen real es más bien la de una dinámica del conocimiento en macroeconomía bastante saludable, lejos de la senda de la autodestrucción que auguran sus críticos.

Sobre la relación entre macroeconomía y política


En relación al debate sobre la relación entre macroeconomía y política, la conclusión de Reis es que la crítica de una importante (y maligna) influencia de los economistas sobre los políticos y la opinión pública es exagerada por lo de importante, y equivocada por lo de maligna. Y pone dos ejemplos: en cuanto a la política fiscal la mayoría de los macroeconomistas defenderían políticas fiscales contracíclicas (déficit en las recesiones y superávit en las expansiones), para suavizar los tipos impositivos en el tiempo y permitir que la política fiscal actuara de estímulo en las recesiones. En cambio, lo que se observa en los países de la OCDE en los últimos 30 años son secuencias muy continuadas de déficits, contrarias a las prescripciones de los economistas. En el terreno de la política fiscal los economistas y los políticos intercambian ideas, pero los políticos se dejan influir poco. En cambio en la política monetaria, suele coincidir que los decisores son también macroeconomistas, por lo que en este terreno se puede juzgar mejor el resultado de confiar en las prescripciones de la macroeconomía. Y lo que se observa aquí es un notable éxito en el control de la inflación y en las respuestas que los bancos centrales han dado a la crisis.

Sobre las perspectivas de futuro

El futuro de la macroeconomía tiene que empezar en las aulas. Reis aboga por tres cambios al respecto, sobre todo en la enseñanza de postgrado: alejarse del modelo base neoclásico para introducir desde el primer momento aspectos más ligados al mundo real; llevar el modelo a los datos; y cambiar el método de enseñanza para reconocer que no todos los estudiantes de postgrado van a iniciar una carrera por el premio Nóbel, lo que es lo mismo que decir que se puede hacer macroeconomía útil utilizando distintos tipos de modelos que sirven a distintos objetivos.
En una nota reciente, la última de cuatro sobre el futuro de los modelos macroeconómicos, Olivier Blanchard, aboga por una mayor diversidad de métodos, en la línea defendida tiempo atrás por Ricardo Caballero, y establece la necesidad de disponer de (al menos) cinco tipos de modelos: (a) Modelos fundacionales que reflejan una contribución teórica fundamental de la que se aprovechan otros modelos macroeconómicos, pero que no tendrían como objetivo captar la realidad de un modo cercano; (b) Modelos DSGE, cuyo propósito sería explorar las implicaciones macroeconómicas de un conjunto de distorsiones. Éstos deberían ser más cercanos a la realidad, pero no al coste de introducir supuestos ad hoc inasumibles desde el punto de vista de la fundamentación microeconómica; (c) Modelos econométricos estructurales, que permiten explorar las implicaciones de distintos tipos de políticas. Se trataría de empezar por modelos DSGE y después dejar hablar a los datos para introducir estructura adicional; (d) Toy models, pensados para ilustrar rápidamente una "research question", o condensar el mensaje de modelos más complicados; (e) Modelos de predicción cuya finalidad es ofrecer la mejor predicción, con independencia del contenido teórico que incorporen.
A lo largo de los años he conocido macroeconomistas capaces de cabalgar con facilidad entre estos distintos tipos de modelos, tan sutiles como para fabricar un juguete con el que contar una fábula o para descubrir con la ayuda de un DSGE la belleza de un nuevo mecanismo, pero también tan valientes como para pelearse a machetazos con los datos o vencer a Sauron lanzando la pesada carga de sus simulaciones al Monte del Destino. Estos son mis héroes. Que nadie se extrañe: todavía me emociono cuando veo a Aragorn coronarse rey de Góndor.

http://nadaesgratis.es/javier-ferri/esta-la-macroeconomia-tan-enferma

No se trata del crecimiento en el número de publicaciones, sino en el peso de las publicaciones macro sobre las publicaciones totales. Podemos estar de acuerdo en que no es un indicador infalible de la salud de la macroeconomía, pero yo sí lo interpreto como una condición necesaria. Si ves a un niño que corre, juega, se cae, se levanta, suda y se enfada no puedes deducir necesariamente que está sano, pero yo desde luego me preocuparía mucho más si lo viera triste, apático y languideciendo. Las revistas quieren publicar buenos trabajos (viven de ello) en un espacio limitado, y los economistas queremos leer buenos trabajos. Que buenas revistas se decanten por publicar cada vez más trabajos macro algo querrá decir sobre la salud de la macro (aunque siempre tienes la alternativa de pensar que existe un complot ideado por los macroeconomistas). En mi entrada, siguiendo a Reis, cito tres revistas: American Economic Review, Journal of the European Economic Association y Journal of Monetary Economics. ¿Has encontrado muchos fallos fundamentales en sus artículos?

Qué opinas del artículo de Paul Romer que afirma que en macro no se ha avanzado nada en 30 años?
https://paulromer.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/WP-Trouble.pdf

Déjame empezar diciendo que no me fío de los pseudo-mesías que se presentan a sí mismos como salvadores en un mundo de ciegos o cobardes. Y así, literalmente (excepto por lo de pseudo), es como se presenta Paul Romer en el artículo que citas. Decir que la macroeconomía ha involucionado en los últimos 30 años me parece ridículamente injusto. Hay tres argumentos básicos en el venenoso discurso de Romer:
Rta
1. La macroeconomía moderna desprecia el papel de la política monetaria en las variables reales. Es en este punto donde se intuye más claro que en el trasfondo del artículo existe una guerra entre Romer y Lucas-Sargent-Prescott con aparentes matices personales. En los modelos con los que yo he trabajado, que caen dentro del enfoque de la Nueva Macroeconomía Keynesiana, la política monetaria juega su papel en el ciclo económico. Yo no sé cómo de moderna y pura consideraran algunos esta macroeconomía (recuerdo un rechazo de un artículo en una muy buena revista generalista con el argumento de que aunque no había nada intrínsecamente malo en mi modelo y aunque el tema que abordaba era relevante, la mala suerte había hecho que cayera en manos de un referee –el que escribía- que no se creía ese tipo de fricciones nominales) pero puedo asegurar que pertenece a las tres últimas décadas.

2. Los modelos DSGE están plagados de shocks imaginarios y los problemas de
identificación son enormes. Esta crítica tiene más fuerza de forma aislada, que es como Romer la utiliza, que situándola en el contexto apropiado. Si queremos hacer una crítica justa de la macroeconomía moderna (en comparación con el estado de la macro 30 años atrás) debemos entender lo que los modelos DSGE han supuesto en el desarrollo de una arquitectura macroeconómica basada en problemas económicos micro-fundamentados, consistentes con restricciones agregadas de recursos, el tratamiento de la dinámica y la formación de expectativas, o la caracterización explícita de los shocks que pueden afectar a la economía. ¿No son éstas características deseables para empezar a construir un modelo? ¿Preferimos de verdad volver a ofrecer un papel relevante a los modelos macroeconométricos sujetos a la crítica de Lucas? No estoy defendiendo el pensamiento único. Como he dicho en mi post, me identifico con una posición ecléctica en la que tienen cabida distintos tipos de modelos, y en la que se construye sobre lo que funciona y se va abandonando lo que no funciona, que es distinto de despreciar todo lo aprendido. Sobre los shocks: la imagen que da Romer me parece una caricatura. Entiendo que un economista que ha dedicado tanto esfuerzo y nos haya ayudado tanto a entender lo que hay detrás de la evolución de la PTF no tenga muy buena consideración de un shock agregado a la productividad, pero no veo nada intrínsecamente malo en saber si en un determinado periodo algo que no explicamos pero que tiene que ver con la forma en la que los inputs se transforman en producción está por encima o por debajo de la media. Sinceramente pienso que esto es también conocimiento útil. Útil pero mejorable, nadie lo discute. Sobre la identificación: entiendo la crítica y la comparto, con matices. (1) La calibración está más ligada a los datos macro, y a la consistencia interna del modelo de lo que el artículo de Romer refleja. De esta forma se recupera un conjunto no despreciable de parámetros (2) Los parámetros que se ligan a estudios empíricos (algunos de corte micro) suelen ser el claro objeto de análisis de sensibilidad, que es la pata (importante) de la metodología ausente en el debate (3) La estimación es transparente sobre lo difusa que el investigador esté considerando que es la información a priori y por lo tanto sobre el peso que le otorga a que los datos hablen.

3. Los jóvenes economistas son esclavos de tres dioses: Lucas, Prescott y Sargent, por lo que la a la macroeconomía le espera un negro futuro. Sobre esto ya he hablado en la entrada, pues es una crítica que se nota que molestó especialmente a Ricardo Reis." J.F.

--
La cuestión a la que debería responder este debate es ¿Puede la macroeconomía convencional explicar la dinámica endógena hacia el desequilibrio, la descoordinación y la inestabilidad que experimentó la economía mundial en 2007-2013? ¿Hay un modelo de EGDE que permita entender lo que ha ocurrido y enseñarlo? Yo creo que no, pero si hay alguno me gustaría verlo. El problema tiene que ver con el alejamiento del núcleo microeconómico con el que se construyen los modelos EGDE de la realidad. Blanchard habla de la heterogeneidad o la racionalidad limitada como distorsiones a aplicar a un núcleo neoclásico. No son distorsiones, son bases distintas para un núcleo microeconómico que responda mejor a la realidad en la que los agentes toman decisiones e interactúan. Creo que lo mejor del papel de Reis son las diez sugerencias sobre las que construir un nuevo modelo de referencia. Él asegura que son tratables y se pueden representar con modelos sencillos. Tengo dudas de que se pueda mantener la visión de equilibrio con esos supuestos más realistas. Si fuera fácil, ya se habría hecho. Respecto a la política monetaria, me parece un poco complaciente la afirmación de Reis de que la macro ha funcionado bien. Ha ido a remolque tratando de evitar la depresión e innovandoo respecto a las políticas convencionales (como el inflation targeting).
rta
Creo entender que tu argumento simpatiza con el de la confrontación entre núcleo (DSGE alejado de la realidad) frente a la periferia (modelos más cerca de la realidad) de Ricardo Caballero . Yo no comparto esa visión confrontada, pienso que los DSGE pueden ser muy flexibles para acoger elementos que acerquen el modelo a los datos. Un ejemplo: este trabajo del propio Caballero con Bachmann y Engel https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aejmac/v5y2013i4p29-67.html
--
Olivier escribe "There is a reason why they [the toy models] dominate undergraduate macroeconomics textbooks: They work as pedagogical devices". Según el último boletín recibido de Ecobook, acaba de publicarse la 7ª edición traducida al español de su manual de macro intermedia, repleta de esos "toy models" (más detalles en https://piie.com/blogs/realtime-economic-issues-watch/how-teach-intermediate-macroeconomics-after-crisis ) en competencia directa con el manual de Mankiw mencionado en la nota de Reis
---
Blanchard: "I was struck by how many times during the crisis I had to explain the “paradox of saving” and fight the Hoover-German line, “Reduce your budget deficit, keep your house in order, and don’t worry, the economy will be in good shape.” Anybody who argues along these lines must explain how it is consistent with the IS relation."
Lo que es increíble es que alguien siga defendiendo el modelo ISLM, erre que erre, y pase lo que pase por el mundo: ahora es que no considerábamos el sistema financiero, ahora es que los tipos de interés no son los que igualan IS y LM, ahora es que la curva de Phillips es incorrecta, ahora es....
A la cuestión de Blanchard se ha respondido desde hace más de 80 años desde la escuela austríaca y nada, como el que oye llover: ¡ Mírate los triángulos hayekianos de una vez ¡ Si se siguen agregando distintos plazos en un solo "ahorro" los modelos seguirán mal los parametrices como los parametrices. El "ahorro" son distintos ahorros y la "inversión" son distintas inversiones y el "crédito" son distintos créditos. S=I es una mezcolanza que entra fácil en los modelos y poco más
rta
Personalmente no veo problema en caracterizar el corto plazo con una IS dinámica (que determina el tipo de interés real en el largo plazo), una regla de Taylor para la política monetaria y una curva de Phillips, y en considerar que el tipo de interés en una economía puede diferir por varios motivos del que fija el Banco Central (el caso de España, Grecia o Italia durante la crisis). Tampoco hay nada en este marco que impida considerar distintos plazos en el vencimiento e los bonos.
---
Mi intención era retratar la imagen tremendista que surge de la economía por la agregación de dos tipos de críticas que no comparto, y que no son infrecuentes, como en los ejemplos de Rubinstain y Romer que citas: (1) la única economía inmaculada es la que hago yo (o crítica umbilical); (2) la macroeconomía después de Lucas es un fiasco (o crítica a la totalidad).
Te dejo un enlace a otra nota reciente sobre el tema, de Fabio Ghironi (con link al final del mismo a un artículo más extenso) http://faculty.washington.edu/ghiro/GhiroOnTheBlanchardClassification042017.pdf
--
http://nadaesgratis.es/santiago-sanchez-pages/modelos-economia-y-economistas-un-debate
http://nadaesgratis.es/admin/la-influencia-practica-de-la-investigacion-en-economia
http://nadaesgratis.es/marcel-jansen/el-economista-como-fontanero
http://nadaesgratis.es/juan-francisco-jimeno/econopatias
--
MACROECONOMICS AFTER THE CRISIS: TIME TO DEAL WITH THE PRETENSE-OF-KNOWLEDGE SYNDROME
Ricardo J. Caballero
Working Paper 16429 http://www.nber.org/papers/w16429
---




22 abril 2017

Futures Studies:Theories and Methods Sohail Inayatullah

INTRODUCTION

Futures studies is the systematic study of possible, probable and preferable futures including the worldviews and myths that underlie each future. In the last fifty or so years, the study of the future has moved from predicting the future to mapping alternative futures to shaping desired futures, both at external collective levels and inner individual levels (Masini 1993; Bell 1996; Amara 1981; Sardar 1999; Inayatullah 2000; Saul 2001). During this period, futures studies has moved from focusing on the external objective world to a layered approach wherein how one sees the world actually shapes the future one sees (Inayatullah 2002). In this critical futures approach — the poststructural turn — the external world is informed by the inner and, crucially, a person’s inner world is informed by the reality of the external. While many embrace futures studies so as to reduce risk, to avoid negative futures, particularly the worst case, others actively move to creating desired futures, positive visions of the future (Masini 1983). The identification of alternative futures is thus a fluid dance of structure (the weights of history) and agency (the capacity to influence the world and create desired futures). 

As the world has become increasingly risky — at least in perception, if not in fact — futures studies has been eagerly adopted by executive leadership teams and planning departments in organizations, institutions and nations throughout the world. While futures studies sits comfortably as an executive function by providing the big picture, thereremain tangible tensions between the planning and futures frameworks. Planning seeks to control and close the future, while futures studies seeks to open up the future, moving from “the” future to alternative futures. To understand the future(s), one needs a cogent theoretical framework. Four approaches are crucial to foresight (Inayatullah 1990). The first is predictive, based on empirical social sciences. The second is interpretive, based not on forecasting the future but on understanding competing images of the future. The third is critical, derived from poststructural thought and focused on asking who benefits by the realization of certain futures and which methodologies privilege certain types of futures studies. While truth claims are eschewed, the price of epistemology is not: every knowledge decision privileges reality in particular ways (Shapiro 1992; Foucault 1973). The fourth approach is participatory action learning/research. This approach is far more democratic and focuses on stakeholders developing their own future, based on their assumptions of the future (for example, if the future is linear or cyclical) and what is critical to them (Inayatullah 2007). While a theory of the future is useful, a conceptual framework for understanding the future is still necessary. Among others is the Six Pillars approach (Inayatullah 2008). The first pillar is “Mapping the future,” with its primary method being the futures triangle (Inayatullah 2002; 2007). The second pillar is “Anticipating the future” with emerging issues analysis (Molitor 2003) as the focal methodology. The third pillar is “Timing the future,” with micro-, meso- and macrohistory (Galtung and Inayatullah 1997) being the most useful “methods.” The fourth pillar is “Deepening the future” with causal layered analysis (Inayatullah 2004) being the foundation (even though causal layered analysis is a theory of futures studies as well). The fifth pillar is “Creating alternatives” with scenario planning being the most important method. The last pillar, “Transforming the future,” has visioning and backcasting (Boulding 1995) as its most important methods.

From the premodern to the modern 

Premodern attempts to understand the future focused on astrology. By and large, the purpose of astrology was to help individuals avoid dangerous circumstances by providing an early warning system. However, unquestioned belief in the astrological system was essential since warnings and forecasts as well as psychological analyses were of a general nature. The future was not contested. In modern futures studies, questioning and divergent views are not only incorporated, they are essential to robustness and resilience. In contrast to astrology, alternatives are embraced.
While recent futures studies includes contesting the views of the future as well as ways of knowing — the deep cultural myths and metaphors — of researchers and participants, a generation back futures studies placed a far greater emphasis on forecasting. 

It was the technique par excellence of planners, economists and social scientists. The assumption behind forecasting is that the future can be generally if not precisely known. With more information, particularly more timely information, decision-makers can make more effective choices. Having more information is especially important since the rate of technological change has dramatically increased. However, the need for information, as in times before, is necessitated by a fear of the future, a feeling of impotence in the face of forces we cannot understand, that seem larger than us. The unconscious assumption is that through better forecasting, the world, the future, can be more effectively controlled thus increasing profits or hegemony. As business-as-usual has disappeared — largely due to a perception that the world is far riskier (the break-up of the Soviet Union, the Asian Financial Crisis, 9/11, SARS, Bird Flu, the Global Financial Crisis, climate change, the potential breakdown of the Eurozone) — futures studies has become more commonplace. Change truly has become the norm. Dramatic developments in digital, genomic, nano and neuro technologies point to more disruptions. 

The rise of Chindia and the relative decline of the USA suggest that the uni-polar world is finished. In response, governmental, corporate, think-tank and non-government organizations have embraced the formal study of the future. Some use futurists as consultants who provide market advice; others use futurists to develop internal capacity through foresight workshops; and still others have senior executives attend more formal courses in futures studies. This has led to discussion as to where, within organizations, it is best to house the study of the future. More often than not, futures studies is housed in the planning department. However, while this may appear logical, as both deal with forward time, there are significant differences between the two


Futures studies creates alternative futures by making basic assumptions problematic. Through questioning the future,emerging issues analysis,and scenarios,the intention is to move out of the present and create the possibility for new futures

PLANNING, POLICY AND FUTURES STUDIES

When compared to planning, the futures approach:

1. is longer-term, from five to fifty years (even 1 000 years) instead of one to five years; 
2. links horizon three (20–30 years) with horizon two (5–20) and horizon one (the present to five years); 
3. is committed to authentic alternative futures where each scenario is fundamentally different from the other. When planners and economic forecasters use scenarios, they are often mere deviations from each other; 
4. is committed to multiple interpretations of reality (legitimating the role of the unconscious, of mythology, of the spiritual, for example, instead of only views of reality for which empirical data exists); 
5. is more participatory, in that it attempts to include all types of stakeholders instead of only powerbrokers; 
6. consciously uses different ways of knowing, from drama or postcards from the future to various games (for example, the Sarkar game [Hayward and Voros 2006], or the CLA game); 
7. is more concerned with the futures process, which is as important as the elegance of the strategic plan itself, if not more so; 
8. although a technique, is also very much action-oriented, more concerned with creating the future than simply predicting it; and 9. is as much an academic field as it is a participatory social movement

...sigue en pdf

The Six Pillars provide a theory of futures thinking that is linked to methods and tools, and developed through praxis.The pillars are: mapping,anticipation,timing, deepening,creating alternatives and transforming

....sigue en pdf

Timing the Future 

The third pillar is Timing the Future. This is the search for the patterns in change, the stages and mechanisms of long-term change. Macrohistorians (Galtung and Inayatullah 1997) posit that a number of patterns are critical if we wish to understand the shape of time: 

1. The future is linear, stage-like, with progress ahead. By hard work, we will realize the good future. Foundational writers include Auguste Comte (1875) and Herbert Spencer (1973). 
2. The future is cyclical; there are ups and downs. Those at the top will one day find themselves at the bottom. Because they are on the top, they are unable to adapt and adjust as the world changes. Their success was based on mastery of yesterday’s conditions. Few are able to reinvent their core stories. Foundational writers are Ssu-Ma Chien (Watson 1958), Ibn Khaldun (1967) and Oswald Spengler (1972). Related to the cycle is the pendulum, developed by Pitirim Sorokin (1957). In this approach, nations and organizations tend to oscillate between extremes of two poles (centralization or decentralization, modernity and religion, or civilian and military rule). Knowing where one is in the pendulum can lead to more effective strategy, helping to decide how and when to act. 
3. The future is a spiral: parts are linear and progress-based, and parts are cyclical. With leadership that is courageous and has foresight, a positive spiral can be created. The dogmas of the past are challenged but the past is not disowned, rather it is integrated in a march toward a better future. The foundational thinker for this approach is P. R. Sarkar (1987). 
4. New futures are more often than not driven by a creative minority. They challenge the notion of a used future. Instead of imitating what everyone else is doing, they innovate. This can be social, political, cultural, spiritual or technological innovation. These change agents imagine a different future and inspire others to work toward it. When there is no creative minority, instead of sustainable systems what result are bigger and bigger empires and world-states. Power and bureaucracy continue unchallenged, charisma becomes routinized and the hunger for something different, something that can better meet human needs, drifts away. Size or growth takes over; inner and outer development disappears. The work of Arnold Toynbee (1972) and, to some extent Vilfredo Pareto (1968), is foundational to this approach. 
5. There are hinge periods in human history, when the action of a few can make a dramatic difference. It is in these periods, especially, that old ways of behaviour are no longer helpful: what succeeded before no longer works. We are likely in this phase now. This approach is generally favoured by most transformational futurists — Alvin Toffler, Oliver Markley, Duane Elgin, P. R. Sarkar, Riane Eisler, Ervin László, Hazel Henderson, James Dator, James Robertson and many others share this framework
(pag 48)

The third scenario method is developed by James Dator. 
It articulates scenario archetypes (Dator 1979). 
These are: 
• Continued Growth — where current conditions are enhanced: more products, more roads, more technology, and a greater population. More growth is considered the solution to every problem. 

• Collapse — this future emerges as “Continued Growth” fails. The contradictions are too great: between the economy and nature; between men and women; between the speculative and the real economy; between religious, secular and postmodern approaches; and between technology and culture. 

• Steady State — this future seeks to arrest growth and find a balance in the economy and with nature. It is a balanced, softer and fairer society. Community is decisive in this future. Steady State is both back to nature and back to the past. Human values are first here. Endless growth — cities, an expanding population, technology — is often seen as the problem. 

• Transformation — this future seeks to change the basic assumptions of the other three. Transformation comes about either through dramatic technological change (artificial intelligence eliminates the bureaucracy and many forms of governance; genetics changes the nature of nature, for example) or through spiritual change (humans change their consciousness through experience of deep transcendence).

(pag 56)

Backcasting 
The vision can then be backcasted. Developed by Elise Boulding (Boulding and Boulding 1995), backcasting works by moving individuals into the preferred future — or any particular scenario, for example, the worst case. We then ask, in the instance of the preferred, what happened in the last twenty years to bring us to today? What were the trends and events that created today? Backcasting fills in the space between today (the future) and the past. Doing so makes the future far more achievable. The necessary steps to achieve the preferred future can then be enacted. This can be done via a plan or via action learning steps, where a process of experimentation begins to create the desired future. This can be a budgeted-for transition strategy or a full-scale reengineering.

Backcasting as well can be used to avoid the worst-case scenario. Once the steps that led to the worst-case scenario are developed, then strategies to avoid that scenario can be enacted.

(pag 58)

Conflict between visions 

What happens, though, when there is conflict between visions of the future? Johan Galtung’s transcend method (1998) (Figure 3) is an excellent way forward (see www. transcend. org). It focuses not on compromise, or far worse, withdrawal, but on finding win–win solutions. To do so, all the issues that are contested in the two visions need to be spelled out. And then through a process of brainstorming, creating alternatives, new ways to integrate the visions can occur. In one city case study, one stakeholder group desired a green sustainable city; another group, a far more exciting modern, international and glamorous city. Through the transcend method, the greens understood that their city would become boring. They thus realized that the glamorous vision was a way to recover that aspect of their disowned personalities, but also that the modern dimension of the city could help them innovate. The modernists understood that without sustainability as a guiding principal there would be no way forward for anyone: each aspect of the vision needed the other. A more integrative vision was articulated, using this method, from which strategies could be developed.

(pag 60)

QUESTIONING THE FUTURE

The Six Pillars process can also be reduced to the following simple questions. The questions in themselves are a method: a way to question the future. They can be used to help individuals and organizations to embark on transformation. 

1. What is the history of the issue? Which events and trends have created the present? 
2. What are your projections of the future? If current trends continue, what will the future look like? 3. What are the hidden assumptions of your predicted future? Are there some things taken for granted (about gender, or nature or technology or culture)? 
4. What are some alternatives to your predicted or feared future? If you change some of your assumptions, what alternatives emerge? 
5. What is your preferred future? 
6. How did you get here? What steps did you take to realize the present? The final question is based on CLA: 
7. Is there a supportive narrative, a story? If not, create a metaphor or story that can provide cognitive and emotive support for realizing the desired future


To conclude, futures studies — research — is concerned not only with forecasting the future, interpreting the future and critiquing the future, but also with creating not just the possibility but the reality of alternative worlds, alternative futures. Through structured methods, the emergence of new visions and strategies result. The Six Pillars approach provides a conceptual and methodological framework for this journey.

(pag 61)

http://transicionsocioeconomica.blogspot.com.es/2017/04/futures-studiestheories-and-methods.html

resto en pdf

http://www.metafuture.org/library1/FuturesStudies/Futures-Studies-theories-and-methods-published-version-2013-with-pics.pdf

INTRODUCTION

Futures studies is the systematic study of possible, probable and preferable futures including the worldviews and myths that underlie each future. In the last fifty or so years, the study of the future has moved from predicting the future to mapping alternative futures to shaping desired futures, both at external collective levels and inner individual levels (Masini 1993; Bell 1996; Amara 1981; Sardar 1999; Inayatullah 2000; Saul 2001). During this period, futures studies has moved from focusing on the external objective world to a layered approach wherein how one sees the world actually shapes the future one sees (Inayatullah 2002). In this critical futures approach — the poststructural turn — the external world is informed by the inner and, crucially, a person’s inner world is informed by the reality of the external. While many embrace futures studies so as to reduce risk, to avoid negative futures, particularly the worst case, others actively move to creating desired futures, positive visions of the future (Masini 1983). The identification of alternative futures is thus a fluid dance of structure (the weights of history) and agency (the capacity to influence the world and create desired futures). 

As the world has become increasingly risky — at least in perception, if not in fact — futures studies has been eagerly adopted by executive leadership teams and planning departments in organizations, institutions and nations throughout the world. While futures studies sits comfortably as an executive function by providing the big picture, thereremain tangible tensions between the planning and futures frameworks. Planning seeks to control and close the future, while futures studies seeks to open up the future, moving from “the” future to alternative futures. To understand the future(s), one needs a cogent theoretical framework. Four approaches are crucial to foresight (Inayatullah 1990). The first is predictive, based on empirical social sciences. The second is interpretive, based not on forecasting the future but on understanding competing images of the future. The third is critical, derived from poststructural thought and focused on asking who benefits by the realization of certain futures and which methodologies privilege certain types of futures studies. While truth claims are eschewed, the price of epistemology is not: every knowledge decision privileges reality in particular ways (Shapiro 1992; Foucault 1973). The fourth approach is participatory action learning/research. This approach is far more democratic and focuses on stakeholders developing their own future, based on their assumptions of the future (for example, if the future is linear or cyclical) and what is critical to them (Inayatullah 2007). While a theory of the future is useful, a conceptual framework for understanding the future is still necessary. Among others is the Six Pillars approach (Inayatullah 2008). The first pillar is “Mapping the future,” with its primary method being the futures triangle (Inayatullah 2002; 2007). The second pillar is “Anticipating the future” with emerging issues analysis (Molitor 2003) as the focal methodology. The third pillar is “Timing the future,” with micro-, meso- and macrohistory (Galtung and Inayatullah 1997) being the most useful “methods.” The fourth pillar is “Deepening the future” with causal layered analysis (Inayatullah 2004) being the foundation (even though causal layered analysis is a theory of futures studies as well). The fifth pillar is “Creating alternatives” with scenario planning being the most important method. The last pillar, “Transforming the future,” has visioning and backcasting (Boulding 1995) as its most important methods.

From the premodern to the modern 

Premodern attempts to understand the future focused on astrology. By and large, the purpose of astrology was to help individuals avoid dangerous circumstances by providing an early warning system. However, unquestioned belief in the astrological system was essential since warnings and forecasts as well as psychological analyses were of a general nature. The future was not contested. In modern futures studies, questioning and divergent views are not only incorporated, they are essential to robustness and resilience. In contrast to astrology, alternatives are embraced.
While recent futures studies includes contesting the views of the future as well as ways of knowing — the deep cultural myths and metaphors — of researchers and participants, a generation back futures studies placed a far greater emphasis on forecasting. 

It was the technique par excellence of planners, economists and social scientists. The assumption behind forecasting is that the future can be generally if not precisely known. With more information, particularly more timely information, decision-makers can make more effective choices. Having more information is especially important since the rate of technological change has dramatically increased. However, the need for information, as in times before, is necessitated by a fear of the future, a feeling of impotence in the face of forces we cannot understand, that seem larger than us. The unconscious assumption is that through better forecasting, the world, the future, can be more effectively controlled thus increasing profits or hegemony. As business-as-usual has disappeared — largely due to a perception that the world is far riskier (the break-up of the Soviet Union, the Asian Financial Crisis, 9/11, SARS, Bird Flu, the Global Financial Crisis, climate change, the potential breakdown of the Eurozone) — futures studies has become more commonplace. Change truly has become the norm. Dramatic developments in digital, genomic, nano and neuro technologies point to more disruptions. 

The rise of Chindia and the relative decline of the USA suggest that the uni-polar world is finished. In response, governmental, corporate, think-tank and non-government organizations have embraced the formal study of the future. Some use futurists as consultants who provide market advice; others use futurists to develop internal capacity through foresight workshops; and still others have senior executives attend more formal courses in futures studies. This has led to discussion as to where, within organizations, it is best to house the study of the future. More often than not, futures studies is housed in the planning department. However, while this may appear logical, as both deal with forward time, there are significant differences between the two


Futures studies creates alternative futures by making basic assumptions problematic. Through questioning the future,emerging issues analysis,and scenarios,the intention is to move out of the present and create the possibility for new futures

PLANNING, POLICY AND FUTURES STUDIES

When compared to planning, the futures approach:

1. is longer-term, from five to fifty years (even 1 000 years) instead of one to five years; 
2. links horizon three (20–30 years) with horizon two (5–20) and horizon one (the present to five years); 
3. is committed to authentic alternative futures where each scenario is fundamentally different from the other. When planners and economic forecasters use scenarios, they are often mere deviations from each other; 
4. is committed to multiple interpretations of reality (legitimating the role of the unconscious, of mythology, of the spiritual, for example, instead of only views of reality for which empirical data exists); 
5. is more participatory, in that it attempts to include all types of stakeholders instead of only powerbrokers; 
6. consciously uses different ways of knowing, from drama or postcards from the future to various games (for example, the Sarkar game [Hayward and Voros 2006], or the CLA game); 
7. is more concerned with the futures process, which is as important as the elegance of the strategic plan itself, if not more so; 
8. although a technique, is also very much action-oriented, more concerned with creating the future than simply predicting it; and
9. is as much an academic field as it is a participatory social movement

...sigue en pdf

The Six Pillars provide a theory of futures thinking that is linked to methods and tools, and developed through praxis.The pillars are: mapping,anticipation,timing, deepening,creating alternatives and transforming

....sigue en pdf

Timing the Future 

The third pillar is Timing the Future. This is the search for the patterns in change, the stages and mechanisms of long-term change. Macrohistorians (Galtung and Inayatullah 1997) posit that a number of patterns are critical if we wish to understand the shape of time: 

1. The future is linear, stage-like, with progress ahead. By hard work, we will realize the good future. Foundational writers include Auguste Comte (1875) and Herbert Spencer (1973). 
2. The future is cyclical; there are ups and downs. Those at the top will one day find themselves at the bottom. Because they are on the top, they are unable to adapt and adjust as the world changes. Their success was based on mastery of yesterday’s conditions. Few are able to reinvent their core stories. Foundational writers are Ssu-Ma Chien (Watson 1958), Ibn Khaldun (1967) and Oswald Spengler (1972). Related to the cycle is the pendulum, developed by Pitirim Sorokin (1957). In this approach, nations and organizations tend to oscillate between extremes of two poles (centralization or decentralization, modernity and religion, or civilian and military rule). Knowing where one is in the pendulum can lead to more effective strategy, helping to decide how and when to act. 
3. The future is a spiral: parts are linear and progress-based, and parts are cyclical. With leadership that is courageous and has foresight, a positive spiral can be created. The dogmas of the past are challenged but the past is not disowned, rather it is integrated in a march toward a better future. The foundational thinker for this approach is P. R. Sarkar (1987). 
4. New futures are more often than not driven by a creative minority. They challenge the notion of a used future. Instead of imitating what everyone else is doing, they innovate. This can be social, political, cultural, spiritual or technological innovation. These change agents imagine a different future and inspire others to work toward it. When there is no creative minority, instead of sustainable systems what result are bigger and bigger empires and world-states. Power and bureaucracy continue unchallenged, charisma becomes routinized and the hunger for something different, something that can better meet human needs, drifts away. Size or growth takes over; inner and outer development disappears. The work of Arnold Toynbee (1972) and, to some extent Vilfredo Pareto (1968), is foundational to this approach. 
5. There are hinge periods in human history, when the action of a few can make a dramatic difference. It is in these periods, especially, that old ways of behaviour are no longer helpful: what succeeded before no longer works. We are likely in this phase now. This approach is generally favoured by most transformational futurists — Alvin Toffler, Oliver Markley, Duane Elgin, P. R. Sarkar, Riane Eisler, Ervin László, Hazel Henderson, James Dator, James Robertson and many others share this framework
(pag 48)

The third scenario method is developed by James Dator. 
It articulates scenario archetypes (Dator 1979). 
These are: 
• Continued Growth — where current conditions are enhanced: more products, more roads, more technology, and a greater population. More growth is considered the solution to every problem. 

• Collapse — this future emerges as “Continued Growth” fails. The contradictions are too great: between the economy and nature; between men and women; between the speculative and the real economy; between religious, secular and postmodern approaches; and between technology and culture. 

• Steady State — this future seeks to arrest growth and find a balance in the economy and with nature. It is a balanced, softer and fairer society. Community is decisive in this future. Steady State is both back to nature and back to the past. Human values are first here. Endless growth — cities, an expanding population, technology — is often seen as the problem. 

• Transformation — this future seeks to change the basic assumptions of the other three. Transformation comes about either through dramatic technological change (artificial intelligence eliminates the bureaucracy and many forms of governance; genetics changes the nature of nature, for example) or through spiritual change (humans change their consciousness through experience of deep transcendence).

(pag 56)

Backcasting 
The vision can then be backcasted. Developed by Elise Boulding (Boulding and Boulding 1995), backcasting works by moving individuals into the preferred future — or any particular scenario, for example, the worst case. We then ask, in the instance of the preferred, what happened in the last twenty years to bring us to today? What were the trends and events that created today? Backcasting fills in the space between today (the future) and the past. Doing so makes the future far more achievable. The necessary steps to achieve the preferred future can then be enacted. This can be done via a plan or via action learning steps, where a process of experimentation begins to create the desired future. This can be a budgeted-for transition strategy or a full-scale reengineering.

Backcasting as well can be used to avoid the worst-case scenario. Once the steps that led to the worst-case scenario are developed, then strategies to avoid that scenario can be enacted.

(pag 58)

Conflict between visions 

What happens, though, when there is conflict between visions of the future? Johan Galtung’s transcend method (1998) (Figure 3) is an excellent way forward (see www. transcend. org). It focuses not on compromise, or far worse, withdrawal, but on finding win–win solutions. To do so, all the issues that are contested in the two visions need to be spelled out. And then through a process of brainstorming, creating alternatives, new ways to integrate the visions can occur. In one city case study, one stakeholder group desired a green sustainable city; another group, a far more exciting modern, international and glamorous city. Through the transcend method, the greens understood that their city would become boring. They thus realized that the glamorous vision was a way to recover that aspect of their disowned personalities, but also that the modern dimension of the city could help them innovate. The modernists understood that without sustainability as a guiding principal there would be no way forward for anyone: each aspect of the vision needed the other. A more integrative vision was articulated, using this method, from which strategies could be developed.

(pag 60)

QUESTIONING THE FUTURE

The Six Pillars process can also be reduced to the following simple questions. The questions in themselves are a method: a way to question the future. They can be used to help individuals and organizations to embark on transformation. 

1. What is the history of the issue? Which events and trends have created the present? 
2. What are your projections of the future? If current trends continue, what will the future look like? 3. What are the hidden assumptions of your predicted future? Are there some things taken for granted (about gender, or nature or technology or culture)? 
4. What are some alternatives to your predicted or feared future? If you change some of your assumptions, what alternatives emerge? 
5. What is your preferred future? 
6. How did you get here? What steps did you take to realize the present? The final question is based on CLA: 
7. Is there a supportive narrative, a story? If not, create a metaphor or story that can provide cognitive and emotive support for realizing the desired future


To conclude, futures studies — research — is concerned not only with forecasting the future, interpreting the future and critiquing the future, but also with creating not just the possibility but the reality of alternative worlds, alternative futures. Through structured methods, the emergence of new visions and strategies result. The Six Pillars approach provides a conceptual and methodological framework for this journey.

(pag 61)

FROM A FOCUS ON PREDICTING THE FUTURE, THE MODERN DISCIPLINE OF FUTURES STUDIES HAS BROADENED TO AN EXPLORATION OF ALTERNATIVE FUTURES AND DEEPENED TO INVESTIGATE THE WORLDVIEWS AND MYTHOLOGIES THAT UNDERLIE POSSIBLE, PROBABLE AND PREFERRED FUTURES. THIS CHAPTER PROVIDES A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE STUDY OF THE FUTURE. CASE STUDIES DERIVED FROM ORGANIZATIONAL, INSTITUTIONAL AND NATIONAL FORESIGHT STUDIES ARE USED TO ILLUSTRATE THEORIES AND METHODS.

resto en pdf

http://www.metafuture.org/library1/FuturesStudies/Futures-Studies-theories-and-methods-published-version-2013-with-pics.pdf



Estudios del futuro: Teorías y metodologías
por Sohail Inayatullah

Autor del artículo destacado
Los estudios del futuro consisten en el estudio sistemático de futuros posibles, probables y preferibles, incluidas las visiones del mundo y los mitos que subyacen a cada futuro. Durante los últimos cincuenta años aproximadamente, el estudio del futuro ha pasado de predecir el futuro para determinar futuros alternativos a configurar los futuros deseados, tanto a nivel colectivo y externo como a nivel individual e interno (Masini 1993; Bell 1996; Amara 1981; Sardar 1999; Inayatullah 2000; Saul 2001).
A lo largo de este periodo, los estudios del futuro han pasado de centrarse en el mundo externo y objetivo a adoptar un enfoque estratificado en el que nuestra manera de ver el mundo configura el futuro que vemos (Inayatullah 2002). En este enfoque crítico de los estudios del futuro (el giro postestructural), el mundo externo se ve influido por el interno y, de manera crucial, el mundo interior de una persona se ve influido por la realidad exterior. Mientras que muchos recurren a los estudios del futuro para reducir riesgos y evitar los futuros negativos, sobre todo el peor de los casos, otros tratan activamente de crear futuros deseados, con visiones positivas del futuro (Masini 1983). Por tanto, la identificación de futuros alternativos es un baile fluido de estructura (los pesos de la historia) y de acción (la capacidad de influir en el mundo y crear los futuros deseados).
A medida que el mundo se vuelve cada vez más arriesgado, por lo menos en cuanto a su percepción, si no de hecho, los estudios del futuro son adoptados con entusiasmo por equipos de liderazgo ejecutivo y en los departamentos de planificación de organizaciones, instituciones y naciones de todo el mundo. Mientras que los estudios del futuro se adaptan cómodamente a modo de función ejecutiva ofreciendo una visión global, aún se sigue apreciando una serie de tensiones tangibles entre los marcos de la planificación y los estudios del futuro. La planificación pretende controlar y cerrar el futuro, mientras que los estudios del futuro lo que pretenden es abrirlo, avanzando desde “el” futuro único hasta los futuros alternativos.
Para comprender el futuro o los futuros, se necesita un marco teórico coherente. Hay cuatro enfoques que resultan clave para la prospectiva (Inayatullah 1990). El primero es predictivo, basado en las ciencias sociales empíricas. El segundo es interpretativo, basado no en la previsión del futuro, sino en la comprensión de imágenes del futuro contradictorias entre sí. El tercero es crítico, derivado del pensamiento postestructural y centrado en averiguar quién se beneficia de la comprensión de determinados futuros y qué metodologías privilegian a ciertos tipos de estudios del futuro. Mientras que se evitan las pretensiones de verdad, no ocurre lo mismo con el precio de la epistemología: toda decisión derivada del conocimiento privilegia la realidad de diversas maneras (Shapiro 1992; Foucault 1973). El cuarto enfoque consiste en el aprendizaje o investigación mediante la acción participativa. Este enfoque es mucho más democrático y se centra en los grupos de interés que desarrollan su propio futuro, basándose en sus supuestos del futuro (por ejemplo, si el futuro es lineal o cíclico) y los aspectos que les resulten críticos (Inayatullah 2007).
Aunque resulte útil disponer de una teoría del futuro, aún sigue siendo necesario establecer un marco conceptual que nos permita comprender el futuro. Entre los distintos enfoques disponibles, se encuentra el de los Seis Pilares (Inayatullah 2008). El primer pilar consiste en la “Planificación del futuro”, cuyo método principal es el triángulo de futuros (Inayatullah 2002; 2007). El segundo pilar es el de la “Anticipación del futuro”, cuya metodología central consiste en el análisis de problemáticas emergentes (Molitor 2003). El tercer pilar es la “Temporización del futuro”, con la micro, meso y macrohistoria (Galtung e Inayatullah 1997) como “metodologías” más útiles. El cuarto pilar es la “Profundización en el futuro”, que se fundamenta en el análisis causal estratificado (Inayatullah 2004), aunque dicho análisis sea también una teoría de los estudios del futuro. El quinto pilar consiste en la “Creación de alternativas”, empleando como metodología más importante la planificación de escenarios. El sexto y último eje, la “Transformación del futuro”, tiene como metodologías más importantes la visión de futuro y la retrospectiva (Boulding 1995).
De lo premoderno a lo moderno
Lo premoderno trata de entender el futuro centrándose en la astrología. Por lo general, la astrología tenía por finalidad ayudar a las personas a evitar circunstancias peligrosas proporcionándoles un sistema de alerta temprana. Sin embargo, era fundamental creer ciegamente en el sistema astrológico, por el carácter general de las alertas y pronósticos, así como de los análisis psicológicos. En este caso no se cuestionaba el futuro. En los actuales estudios del futuro, no solo se incorporan puntos de vista escépticos y divergentes, sino que resultan imprescindibles para la solidez y la fuerza. A diferencia de la astrología, en los estudios del futuro tienen cabida las alternativas.
Aunque en los recientes estudios del futuro se cuestionen las visiones del futuro, así como las formas de conocimiento (los mitos y metáforas culturales más profundos) de los investigadores y participantes, los estudios futurológicos realizados por la generación anterior hicieron gran hincapié en la previsión, que acabó convirtiéndose en la técnica utilizada por excelencia por planificadores, economistas y especialistas de las ciencias sociales. El supuesto que subyace a la predicción es que el futuro se puede conocer de forma general, pero no de manera exacta. Al disponer de más información, sobre todo de datos más oportunos, los responsables de la toma de decisiones pueden mejorar la eficacia de sus elecciones. Disponer de más información resulta especialmente importante por la velocidad de los cambios tecnológicos, que ha aumentado de forma drástica. Sin embargo, la necesidad de información, tal y como ocurría anteriormente, se hace necesaria por el miedo al futuro, un sentimiento de impotencia frente a unas fuerzas que no logramos entender, que nos parecen más grandes que nosotros. Lo que asumimos inconscientemente es que si mejoramos la predicción el mundo, el futuro se podrá controlar de una manera más eficaz, aumentando de este modo los beneficios o la hegemonía.
Los estudios futurológicos crean futuros alternativos que convierten suposiciones básicas en problemáticas. Mediante el cuestionamiento del futuro, el análisis de problemáticas emergentes y los escenarios, lo que se pretende es salir del presente y crear la posibilidad de nuevos futuros.
Dado que el negocio tal y como lo conocemos ha desaparecido, debido en gran medida a la percepción de que el mundo actual presenta muchos más riesgos (la fragmentación de la Unión Soviética, la crisis financiera asiática, el 11 de septiembre, el SARS, la gripe aviar, la crisis financiera global, el cambio climático, el posible colapso de la eurozona), los estudios del futuro se han convertido en algo más habitual. El cambio se ha convertido verdaderamente en la norma. Los drásticos avances en el campo de la tecnología digital, la tecnología genómica, las nanotecnologías y las neurotecnologías marcan la aparición de más problemas aún. El crecimiento de China e India, y el declive relativo de los Estados Unidos sugieren que el mundo unipolar ha llegado a su fin. Como respuesta, una serie de organizaciones gubernamentales, corporativas, estratégicas y no gubernamentales han adoptado el estudio formal del futuro. Algunas de estas organizaciones emplean a futurólogos como asesores para que les aconsejen sobre los mercados. Otras utilizan a los futurólogos para desarrollar la capacidad interna mediante talleres de prospectiva. Y también hay otras que inscriben a sus altos ejecutivos en cursos de estudios del futuro más formales. Todo esto ha generado un debate respecto a dónde situar el estudio del futuro dentro de las organizaciones. Con mucha frecuencia, los estudios del futuro se asignan al departamento de planificación. Sin embargo, y aunque pueda parecer lógico, dado que en ambos casos se aborda el tiempo que está por venir, existe una serie de diferencias significativas entre ambos.
Planificación, políticas y estudios del futuro
En comparación con la planificación, el enfoque adoptado por los estudios del futuro:
  1. es a más largo plazo, de entre cinco y cincuenta años (o incluso hasta 1 000 años), en lugar de durar entre uno y cinco años;
  2. relaciona el horizonte tres (20-30 años) con el dos (5-20 años) y el uno (desde el presente hasta dentro de cinco años);
  3. apuesta por futuros alternativos auténticos en los que cada escenario es esencialmente distinto de los demás. Cuando los planificadores y previsores económicos recurren a escenarios, muchas veces se trata de meras desviaciones entre unos y otros;
  4. apuesta por múltiples interpretaciones de la realidad (por ejemplo, legitimando el papel del inconsciente, de la mitología o de lo espiritual, en vez de basarse exclusivamente en las visiones de la realidad a partir de datos empíricos);
  5. es más participativo, en tanto que pretende incluir a los distintos grupos de interés, en lugar de solamente a los grupos de poder;
  6. recurre conscientemente a distintas formas de conocimiento, desde las representaciones teatrales o las postales desde el futuro hasta diferentes juegos (por ejemplo, el juego Sarkar [Hayward y Voros 2006] o el juego del CLA);
  7. se centra más en el proceso de los estudios del futuro, que es tan importante como la elegancia del propio plan estratégico, si no más;
  8. a pesar de tratarse de una técnica, está además muy centrado en la acción, más preocupada por la creación del futuro que por su mera predicción; y
  9. es a la vez un campo académico y un movimiento social participativo.
Desde la perspectiva del discurso de la planificación, la función prospectiva es solo uno de los múltiples enfoques necesarios para crear un buen plan. Para los planificadores los estudios del futuro son útiles siempre que les sean de ayuda para planificar el futuro y no compliquen la planificación o elaboración de políticas. Los estudios del futuro pueden ser perjudiciales, en tanto que desafían el marco existente en lugar de tratar de hacer más efectivas las estrategias. Para los estudiosos del futuro, el trastorno producido mediante métodos como el análisis de problemáticas emergentes (popularizado en la obra de Nassim Taleb, The Black Swan, de 2010) y la planificación de escenarios mejora de hecho la efectividad de las estrategias al garantizar la solidez y la fuerza del plan.
El crecimiento experimentado por los estudios del futuro también se deriva del deseo de los gobiernos de encontrar información que pueda serles de ayuda para mejorar sus políticas. Los estudios del futuro, junto al análisis de sistemas, se utilizan para comprender mejor los efectos de segundo o tercer orden de decisiones políticas concretas. Para muchos, la investigación futurológica no es más que un análisis o investigación de políticas a largo plazo, y no debería considerarse como un campo o discurso independiente. Sin embargo, hay una serie de diferencias reales e importantes entre la investigación del futuro y la investigación o análisis de políticas. La más significativa es que los estudios futurológicos crean futuros alternativos que convierten suposiciones básicas en problemáticas. Mediante el cuestionamiento del futuro, el análisis de problemáticas emergentes y los escenarios, lo que se pretende es salir del presente y crear la posibilidad de nuevos futuros. El análisis de políticas se preocupa de analizar la viabilidad de determinadas políticas concretas, sin poner en duda la totalidad del debate o el marco de la toma de decisiones.
Por lo general, en la planificación y el análisis de las políticas, el futuro suele emplearse para mejorar la probabilidad de lograr una determinada política. Esto suele expresarse con la frase “prepararse para el futuro” o “responder a los retos del futuro”. El futuro descrito de este modo resulta singular y con mucha frecuencia se da por hecho. El futuro se convierte en un ruedo de conquista económica y el tiempo se transforma en la dimensión más reciente que colonizar, institucionalizar y domesticar. No obstante, la investigación futurológica pretende liberar tiempo para una técnica estricta, partiendo de la racionalidad instrumental. Se pregunta lo siguiente: ¿de qué maneras podemos “prever” el mundo? ¿De qué manera, por ejemplo, conciben el tiempo diferentes culturas, grupos y organizaciones? No es tanto “prepararse para el futuro”, como desafiar al futuro ortodoxo, abriendo la posibilidad de futuros alternativos. Una vez creados los futuros alternativos, los estudios futurológicos a modo de práctica tratan de desarrollar la capacidad individual y organizativa para inventar el futuro deseado.
No cabe duda de que el análisis de políticas es en sí mismo un campo dinámico. Por ejemplo, los nuevos modelos de desarrollo de políticas han tratado de ir más allá arreglándoselas como han podido (a medida que iban surgiendo necesidades o problemas), tomando decisiones a nivel racional-económico (objetivos materiales) y satisfaciendo (haciendo lo que se puede dentro de las limitaciones políticas y presupuestarias), argumentando fundamentalmente que dichas estrategias no resultan de utilidad durante los periodos de cambios rápidos y crisis dramáticas. Lo de arreglárselas como uno pueda, en concreto, no resulta de utilidad en los momentos turbulentos dado que el cambio de políticas incrementales no ayuda a la organización o nación en cuestión a transformarse para cumplir las nuevas y drásticas condiciones. El modelo racional económico resulta de utilidad a la hora de fijar y alcanzar objetivos, pero no tiene en cuenta los esfuerzos extrarracionales. Depende demasiado de una serie de factores cuantitativos: se reafirma en los intereses propios de por sí y los intereses propios nacionales (equilibrio de poderes). La satisfacción, aunque aventaja a la implementación, no se pregunta si vale la pena realizar el trabajo. El interés por encontrar diferentes maneras de incluir la posibilidad de un cambio discontinuo, de pronosticar las tendencias antes de que surjan, ha tenido una progresión natural en la evolución de las ciencias políticas. Los estudios futurológicos encajan sin problemas en el esfuerzo por encontrar mejores formas de gobierno y negocio para incorporar lo desconocido a la toma de decisiones.
Mientras que los investigadores de políticas preferirían realizar una investigación del futuro que fuera a más corto plazo, inmediatamente ventajosa para la organización y enmarcada dentro del lenguaje de la organización, por lo general, la investigación futurológica suele estar menos preocupada por predecir el futuro y más por tratar de prever novedosas formas de organizar la manera de tomar decisiones y las personas que reúnen los requisitos para participar en dichas decisiones. Para ello, pide a los participantes que traten de visualizar su mundo organizativo ideal y, a continuación, les ayuda a crear estrategias para comprender ese mundo.
Además, desde una perspectiva crítica, sugerir que el encargado de formular las políticas debe tener claras las declaraciones de políticas para el futuro resulta, en cierto modo, simplemente banal. Las instituciones crean un lenguaje oscuro porque dicho lenguaje sirve a unos intereses concretos. En realidad es el análisis de esos intereses (y los mecanismos que se han empleado para buscar y mantener el poder) lo que se convierte en el vehículo para investigar qué imágenes del futuro son posibles y cuáles tienen posibilidad de hacerse realidad. En este sentido, la forma de mejorar las políticas o hacer que estén más orientadas al futuro, sin investigar los intereses políticos que subyacen a algunas de ellas, resulta igualmente banal. Las organizaciones permanecen centradas en el presente como burócratas y otras quedan al servicio de la estructura actual. Los intentos de crear nuevos futuros pueden socavar las estructuras de poder actuales. Los administradores coinciden en tener en cuenta el futuro solamente para conseguir nuevas alianzas políticas o para modernizarse (obtener financiación o prestigio), pero casi nunca para realizar cambios estructurales o de conciencia.
Por lo tanto, implicarse en los estudios del futuro exige como mínimo plantearse una serie de consideraciones teóricas en cuanto a la naturaleza de lo auténtico y lo verdadero. En este sentido, resulta de utilidad concebir el proceso de elaboración de políticas, planificación y futuro como si se compusiera de cuatro dimensiones o tipos: predictiva, interpretativa, crítica y de aprendizaje activo.
Epistemología y tipos de estudios del futuro
En la dimensión predictiva, se asume que el lenguaje es neutral, es decir, que no participa de la constitución de lo auténtico. El lenguaje describe simplemente la realidad como si se tratase de una tinta invisible entre la teoría y los datos. La predicción da por sentado que el universo es determinista, o sea que se puede conocer el futuro. En general, esta visión privilegia a los expertos (planificadores y analistas de políticas, así como a los futurólogos que se dedican a hacer predicciones), economistas y astrólogos. El futuro se convierte en un emplazamiento de especialización y un lugar que colonizar. Por lo general, el discurso estratégico suele darse con mayor asiduidad en este marco con información valorada debido a que proporciona un plazo de entrega y una gama de respuestas para tratar al enemigo (una nación o corporación de la competencia). La técnica que más se usa es la predicción lineal. Los escenarios se utilizan más como desviaciones secundarias de la norma que como visiones del mundo alternativas.
En la dimensión interpretativa, el objetivo no es la predicción, sino la comprensión. La verdad se considera relativa, y el lenguaje y la cultura están estrechamente vinculados para crear lo auténtico. Mediante la comparación, procediendo a examinar distintas imágenes nacionales, de género o étnicas del futuro, conseguimos conocer la condición humana. Este tipo de estudios del futuro es menos técnico y en ellos la mitología es tan importante como las matemáticas. La misión central del enfoque epistemológico es aprender de cada modelo (en el ámbito de la búsqueda de discursos universales que puedan garantizar los valores humanos básicos. Aunque las visiones suelen ocupar un lugar central en esta dimensión interpretativa, el papel de las estructuras también es importante, ya sea la clase, el género u otras categorías de relaciones sociales. La planificación y el análisis de políticas casi nunca practican una forma cultural interpretativa de determinación de objetivos o análisis del impacto.
En su dimensión crítica, los estudios del futuro, más que tratar de predecir o comparar, lo que pretenden es problematizar las unidades de análisis para indefinir el futuro. Por ejemplo, de lo que se trata no es de hacer predicciones de población, sino de averiguar la manera en la que la categoría de población se ha valorizado en el discurso: por ejemplo, nos podríamos preguntar ¿por qué población, en lugar de comunidad o gente? El papel desempeñado por el Estado y otras formas de poder a la hora de crear discursos autorizados es fundamental para comprender la manera en que un futuro en concreto se ha convertido en hegemónico. Los estudios críticos del futuro afirman que el presente es frágil, simplemente la victoria de un discurso concreto, una forma de pensar, sobre otro. El objetivo de la investigación crítica es perturbar las relaciones de poder actuales problematizando nuestras categorías y evocando otros lugares, otros escenarios del futuro.
Los estudios críticos del futuro crítica están inspirados en el postestructuralismo y tienen por tarea convertir lo universal en particular, demostrar que ha sucedido por motivos de fragilidad política, simplemente la victoria de un discurso sobre otro, no un universal platónico. Para lograrlo, se necesitan genealogías discursivas que intenten mostrar las discontinuidades en la historia de cualquier idea, formación social o valor. Mediante la genealogía y la deconstrucción, el futuro que antaño parecía inmutable se muestra ahora como uno de tantos. Como tal se puede sustituir por otros discursos. A continuación, la deconstrucción se convierte en un método para sacar de la maleta un texto (definido ampliamente) y mostrar los discursos que habitan en él. La deconstrucción va más allá del relativismo, al preguntarse cuál es el precio de un discurso concreto. ¿Qué futuro hemos establecido? ¿Qué futuro hemos silenciado?
Históricamente la genealogía rastrea la manera en que un discurso concreto se ha convertido en dominante a costa de otros discursos. La forma y el tipo de futuro (instrumental frente a emancipador, por ejemplo) suele variar en cada tipo de discurso.
Tan importante como la genealogía y la deconstrucción es el concepto del “distanciamiento”. El distanciamiento diferencia el desinterés del empirismo de la reciprocidad de la investigación interpretativa. El distanciamiento aporta el vínculo teórico existente entre el pensamiento postestructural y los estudios del futuro. Los escenarios no se convierten en predicciones, sino en imágenes de lo posible que critican el presente, convirtiendo el presente en algo notable y posibilitando de esta manera la aparición de otros futuros. El distanciamiento también puede conseguirse mediante utopías, dado que estas actúan como lugares “perfectos”, “no existentes” o lejanos, es decir espacios alternativos.
Lo ideal sería que se intentaran utilizar los tres tipos de estudios del futuro. Por ejemplo, si se hace una predicción de población, debería plantearse la manera en la que distintas civilizaciones enfocan la cuestión de la población. Por último, se debería deconstruir la idea de la población en sí misma, procediendo a definirla, por ejemplo, no solo como un problema ecológico del tercer mundo, sino relacionándola también con los patrones de consumo del primer mundo. A continuación, deberá contextualizarse la investigación empírica dentro de la ciencia de las civilizaciones de la cual emerge y, posteriormente, deconstruirse históricamente para mostrar lo que un enfoque concreto no capta o silencia.
En la cuarta dimensión, el aprendizaje activo participativo, la clave es desarrollar estimaciones de futuro probables, posibles y preferidas basándose en las categorías de los grupos de interés. El futuro se construye mediante una profunda participación. Las categorías empleadas no se otorgan a priori, sino más bien se desarrollan a modo de práctica cooperativa. De este modo, el futuro pasa a ser de aquellos que tienen intereses en él. Además, no existe ninguna predicción o visión perfecta, ya que el futuro se replantea y cuestiona constantemente.
En el primer tipo de estudios del futuro (en el que mejor se mueven los planificadores y analistas de políticas), por lo general se emplean técnicas como la regresión lineal, la regresión múltiple, el análisis de factores y la econometría. Todas ellas asumen que el futuro se basa en la linealidad del pasado, además de que se puede conocer el mundo empírico y que el universo es esencialmente estable, con una realidad fundamentalmente perceptible. Sin embargo, dado que los eventos específicos pueden acabar con una predicción, los futurólogos empiristas han reinventado el método Delphi de predicción experta de eventos. El sondeo del método Delphi se lleva a cabo en muchas rondas para así obtener consenso, y se realiza anónimamente para reducir el impacto de cualquier formador de opinión concreto. Más recientemente, por medio del crowdsourcing, el método Delphi ha dado un giro aún más radical, convirtiéndose no en oráculo del gurú experto (futurólogo, economista, científico), sino en una representación de la perspectiva más actualizada del usuario. Mientras que en el método Delphi y otros sistemas similares el conocimiento jerárquico resulta fundamental (uno o varios expertos en diálogo anónimo) en los nuevos sistemas entre pares la información del futuro se deriva de la sabiduría de muchos, según afirman Michael Bauwens, Elina Hiltunen (2011) y José Ramos (2012). Asimismo, la sabiduría de muchos no solo se deriva de medios racionales, sino que, tal como sugiere Stuart Candy (2010), también se deriva de la inmanencia directa, donde un posible escenario del futuro (una ecotopía) se representa en un espacio público.
Los Seis Pilares proporcionan una teoría de pensamiento futurológico vinculada a métodos y herramientas, y desarrollada a través de la praxis. Los pilares son los siguientes: planificación, anticipación, temporización, profundización, creación de alternativas y transformación.
Un marco conceptual para los estudios del futuro: los seis pilares
Los estudios del futuro suelen ser criticados, y con toda la razón, por carecer de un marco conceptual, de un proceso prospectivo. No obstante, en la última década se ha desarrollado una serie de marcos que incorporan una sólida teoría y práctica. Entre estos se incluye el marco del proceso prospectivo genérico de Voros (2003) y el enfoque de los Seis Pilares, que se deriva de la escuela Manoa de Dator (Dator 1979).
Los Seis Pilares proporcionan una teoría de pensamiento futurológico vinculada a métodos y herramientas, y desarrollada a través de la praxis. Los pilares son los siguientes: planificación, anticipación, temporización, profundización, creación de alternativas y transformación. Estos pilares pueden usarse a nivel teórico o en talleres de estudios del futuro. En un taller, se pueden usar en sentido secuencial lineal, es decir, desde la planificación (empleando el triángulo de futuros) hasta la transformación (mediante el pronóstico y la retrospectiva) o bien ser utilizados por el director del taller al seleccionar un pilar concreto en el que centrarse.
Planificación
En este primer pilar, se planifica el pasado, el presente y el futuro. Al planificar el tiempo, nos queda más claro de dónde venimos y a dónde vamos. Estas herramientas resultan cruciales.
El método de la “historia compartida” consiste en hacer que los asistentes a un taller de estudios del futuro anoten las principales tendencias y eventos que nos han llevado hasta el presente. A continuación, se traza una línea temporal histórica hasta el presente. El método de la “historia compartida” pregunta: ¿cuáles son las continuidades y discontinuidades de nuestra historia? Esta herramienta de apertura establece un marco desde el que desplazarnos al futuro. En un entorno de investigación, la historia de la cuestión se articula a través de marcos empíricos (evidencias históricas) o interpretativos de referencia (los significados que los individuos aportan a las evidencias).
El triángulo de futuros determina las visiones actuales del futuro a través de tres dimensiones. La imagen del futuro hace avanzar a una organización. Cada organización o institución tiene imágenes opuestas del futuro. A nivel macroglobal, aunque existen muchas imágenes del futuro, hay cinco arquetípicas, que se detallan a continuación: 1) evolución y progreso: más tecnología, el hombre como centro del mundo y la creencia en la racionalidad; 2) colapso: se tiene la idea de que el hombre ha alcanzado sus límites, de hecho los ha rebasado: desigualdad mundial, fundamentalismo, tribalismo, holocausto nuclear, desastres climáticos: todo apunta a un empeoramiento del futuro; 3) Gaia: el mundo es un jardín y las culturas son sus flores, necesitamos tecnologías sociales para reparar el daño que nos hemos hecho a nosotros mismos, a los demás y a la naturaleza, y lo más importante es ser cada vez más inclusivos. El siguiente salto en la evolución se basa en la colaboración entre los hombres y las mujeres, los humanos y la naturaleza, y los humanos y la tecnología; 4) globalización: las barreras entre naciones y culturas se pueden eliminar si logramos un sistema de mercado libre. La tecnología y el libre movimiento de capital nos pueden hacer ricos a todos. Los tradicionalismos y dogmas constituyen las barreras que nos impiden alcanzar un nuevo mundo, y 5) regreso al futuro: necesitamos volver a una época más sencilla, donde la jerarquía era más clara, cuando la tecnología era menos perjudicial, cuando las normas de la jerarquía estaban claras. El cambio es abrumador: hemos pedido el rumbo y debemos retomarlo.
Junto a las imágenes, están también los empujones del presente, que son los impulsores cuantitativos y las tendencias que están cambiando el futuro: los obvios son el envejecimiento de la población, la penetración del internet móvil, el cambio climático y la cantidad de mujeres que cursan estudios de nivel superior. Pero también hay contrapuntos. Se trata de las barreras al cambio que deseamos ver. Cada imagen tiene diferentes contrapuntos. El contrapunto a las personas que imaginan un mundo globalizado serían los nacionalistas y los proteccionistas. El contrapunto a la imagen gaiana (Lovelock 2006) lo constituye el predominio de la jerarquía (masculina, imperial o del conocimiento). Al analizar la interacción de estas tres fuerzas, el triángulo de futuros nos ayuda a desarrollar un futuro verosímil. A continuación, las estrategias se pueden articular en función de las necesidades: haciendo mayor hincapié en el empuje del futuro, el peso del pasado o el empuje del presente.
Anticipación
El segundo pilar del pensamiento futurológico es la Anticipación, que tiene como método principal (véase la figura 1) el análisis de problemáticas emergentes (Molitor 2003). Lo que pretende el análisis de problemáticas emergentes es identificar las regiones líderes donde se inician las innovaciones sociales. También trata de identificar las problemáticas antes de que se vuelvan rígidas y caras, y, por supuesto, de buscar nuevas posibilidades y oportunidades. Entre las problemáticas emergentes se incluyen elementos perturbadores como, por ejemplo: ¿tendrán pronto los robots derechos legales?, ¿se incluirá la meditación en todos los planes de estudio de las escuelas?, ¿desarrollaremos farmacias en nuestros cuerpos?, ¿nos ayudarán los inodoros inteligentes a realizar un diagnóstico precoz?, ¿redefinirá el movimiento de las ciudades lentas un mundo disponible las 24 horas del día?, ¿nos ayudarán los robots de software inteligentes (eco, salud) a crear personas, casas, comunidades y negocios más eficientes desde una perspectiva energética y sanitaria?, ¿comer carne será ilegal a largo plazo y se verá a corto plazo como un tipo de abuso infantil?
Aunque solucionar las problemáticas emergentes conlleva un pequeño rédito político (esto es, los votantes no recompensarán al líder en cuestión por resolver los problemas del mañana), sí que puede ayudar a reducir al mínimo los daños. De hecho, ayuda a los individuos y organizaciones a responder con mucha más celeridad a los retos emergentes.
Temporización del futuro
El tercer pilar lo constituye la Temporización del futuro, que consiste en la búsqueda de los patrones de cambio, las fases y los mecanismos de cambio a largo plazo. Los macrohistoriadores (Galtung y Inayatullah 1997) plantean que hay una serie de patrones esenciales para entender la configuración del tiempo:
  1. El futuro es lineal, por etapas y con progreso por delante. Si trabajamos duro, haremos realidad el buen futuro. Algunos de los escritores fundacionales de este enfoque son Auguste Comte (1875) y Herbert Spencer (1973).
  2.  El futuro es cíclico: presenta altibajos. Aquellos que están en lo más alto algún día se encontrarán en lo más bajo. Al encontrarse en lo alto, no son capaces de adaptarse y ajustarse a medida que el mundo va cambiando. Su éxito se basaba en el dominio de las condiciones del ayer. Pocos se atreven a reinventar sus historias centrales. Los escritores fundacionales de este enfoque son Ssu-Ma Chien (Watson 1958), Ibn Khaldun (1967) y Oswald Spengler (1972). Relacionado con el ciclo se encuentra el enfoque del péndulo, desarrollado por Pitirim Sorokin (1957). Según dicho enfoque, las naciones y las organizaciones tienen tendencia a oscilar entre los extremos de dos polos (centralización o descentralización, modernidad y religión, o normas civiles y militares). El hecho de saber si nos encontramos en los límites del péndulo nos permite mejorar la eficacia de nuestra estrategia, ayudándonos a decidir cómo y dónde actuar.
  3.  El futuro es una espiral: unas partes son lineales y están basadas en el progreso, y otras partes son cíclicas. Con un liderazgo valiente y prospectivo se puede crear una espiral positiva. Se han cuestionado los dogmas del pasado, pero no se ha renegado del pasado, sino que más bien este se encuentra integrado en una marcha hacia un futuro mejor. El pensador fundamental de este enfoque es P. R. Sarkar (1987).
  4. Los nuevos futuros suelen estar impulsados frecuentemente por una minoría creativa que desafía la noción de un futuro usado. En lugar de imitar lo que hace todo el mundo, ellos se decantan por la innovación, ya sea social, política, cultural, espiritual o tecnológica. Lo que hacen estos agentes del cambio es imaginar un futuro distinto e inspirar a otros para que trabajen en esa dirección. Cuando no existe esa minoría creativa, en lugar de sistemas sostenibles lo que aparece son imperios y Estados cada vez más grandes. El poder y la burocracia siguen siendo indiscutibles, el carisma se vuelve rutinario y las ganas de algo diferente, algo que pueda responder mejor a las necesidades humanas, se dispersan. El tamaño o el crecimiento asumen el poder. El desarrollo interior y exterior desaparece. La obra de Arnold Toynbee (1972) y, en cierta medida, la de Vilfredo Pareto (1968), constituyen la base de este enfoque.
  5.  La historia humana también presenta una serie de periodos “bisagra” en los que las acciones de unos pocos pueden influir de manera espectacular. Es sobre todo en estos periodos donde las antiguas formas de comportamiento dejan de ser útiles: lo que antes tenía éxito deja de funcionar. Es muy probable que ahora mismo nos encontremos en esta fase. Este enfoque suele ser el adoptado por la mayoría de futurólogos transformacionales (Alvin Toffler, Oliver Markley, Duane Elgin, P. R. Sarkar, Riane Eisler, Ervin László, Hazel Henderson, James Dator, James Robertson y otros muchos teóricos comparten esta visión).
A nivel mesoinstitucional, hay tres posturas opuestas en cuanto a la naturaleza del cambio institucional. En primer lugar, el cambio verdadero viene de los que viven en las instituciones. No se trata de cambiar el mundo externo, sino más bien de cambiar nuestra forma de ver el mundo (reconocimiento, gratitud, búsqueda de aspectos positivos en cada situación), en el ahora (Tolle 2003) o de una profunda meditación interior que conduzca al cambio necesario de conciencia (Sarkar 1987). Una vez que nos volvamos diferentes, cambiará la naturaleza de la realidad.
En segundo lugar, el cambio verdadero no es un cambio de conciencia, sino institucional, modificando las leyes que rigen la sociedad, las normas y regulaciones. Impuestos, legislación e incentivos para liderar el cambio social, tal como atestigua el caso de Singapur.
En tercer lugar, el cambio verdadero se deriva de las nuevas tecnologías, dado que estas cambian nuestra forma de hacer las cosas. Tal y como exponía Marshall McLuhan, creamos tecnología y posteriormente ella nos crea a nosotros (1962). Por ejemplo, creamos internet y ahora define nuestra forma de trabajar (flexible pero las 24 horas durante los siete días de la semana), nuestra forma de jugar e incluso nuestra forma de encontrar pareja. La tecnología crea nuevas economías y las tensiones aparecen cuando la sociedad se queda rezagada, cuando las relaciones de poder no cambian.
A nivel mesorganizativo, Jenny Brice, ex miembro de Fuji Xerox, y Patricia Kelly aportan unas teorías del cambio de gran utilidad. Empleando el virus a modo de analogía del cambio social, defienden que el objetivo no es transformar toda la organización, sino simplemente encontrar a los campeones, que suelen representar el 10 % del personal de la organización. En esta búsqueda, resulta esencial no perder el enfoque luchando con los que se resisten al cambio, que también suelen representar un 10 %. Más bien, son puestos en cuarentena con transparencia. Los primeros en adoptar el cambio representan alrededor del 40 % y necesitan ser respaldados (con incentivos y dándoles mayor importancia), mientras que el restante 40 % tiende a ser espectadores que no muestran demasiada preocupación por la dinámica organizativa mientras tengan cubiertas sus necesidades básicas.
Por último, está la microtemporización o biografía del cambio. Hay dos cuestiones a tener en cuenta a este respecto. Por un lado, el pensamiento futurológico varía dependiendo de la fase de la vida en la que uno se encuentre. Por ejemplo, es probable que el futuro de un adolescente se oriente más a corto plazo (debido al desarrollo del cerebro) que el de un adulto. La vulnerabilidad tiene más posibilidades de influir en los mayores que en los adultos jóvenes.
Por otra parte, tenemos la microhistoria que enmarca las fases de la vida. En este caso, la cuestión orientadora es la manera en la que cada uno ve las fases de la vida: la estructura tradicional de nacimiento-estudio-trabajo (un trabajo)-jubilación-muerte o una interpretación alternativa como, por ejemplo, estudio-trabajo (carreras profesionales múltiples o polifacéticas), orientación, vida espiritual, muerte y, posteriormente, renacimiento consciente o inconsciente. Por supuesto, hay otros muchos patrones posibles, incluido el de los transhumanistas que ven las fases de la vida como nacimiento-estudio-trabajo-jubilación y luego una vida inagotable gracias a la prolongación tecnológica de la vida. Por tanto, esta biografía de la vida es la estructura inconsciente que subyace a nuestra manera de imaginar nuestro ciclo de vida. Lo que está en cuestión es lo siguiente: conforme el mundo cambia radicalmente (aumentando la esperanza de vida y dirigiéndonos hacia un futuro gris), ¿seguirá siendo válida esta biografía clásica o será necesario crear nuevos patrones de vida?
De esta manera, la temporización del futuro se centra en hacer un uso acertado de los macropatrones, mesopatrones y micropatrones de cambio para mejorar la influencia en la realidad social.
Profundización en el futuro
El cuarto pilar consiste en profundizar en el futuro. Hay un método fundacional: el análisis causal estratificado (Inayatullah 1998; 2004). El Análisis Causal Estratificado (CLA, en sus siglas en inglés) trata de desentrañar el futuro y profundizar en él. Este método tiene cuatro dimensiones. La primera es la letanía o el futuro cotidiano: los datos, los titulares comúnmente aceptados sobre la forma en que las cosas son o deberían ser. Las soluciones a los problemas a este nivel suelen orientarse a corto plazo. La segunda dimensión es más profunda, centrada en las causas sociales, económicas y políticas de la problemática: lo sistémico. La tercera dimensión es la cultura o visión del mundo, que consiste en la visión de conjunto, el paradigma que informa de que lo que pensamos es real o no, las lentes cognitivas que empleamos para comprender y determinar el mundo. La cuarta dimensión es el mito o la metáfora: el discurso. Las metáforas suelen ser el vehículo de los mitos.
Los niveles más visibles son el 1 y el 2, mientras que el 3 y el 4 son niveles más amplios y profundos, además de ser más difíciles de identificar. Las personas ajenas a la institución u organización son mucho más eficientes a la hora de discernir estos niveles de realidad.
Si pensamos en la asistencia sanitaria, sabemos que hay un índice elevado de errores médicos que ocasionan lesiones graves o incluso la muerte. En el nivel uno, la solución sería impartir más formación a los profesionales sanitarios, en especial a los médicos, ya que los responsables de elaborar las políticas se suelen centrar en la gente. En el nivel 2, trataríamos de buscar las causas que han motivado dichos errores. ¿Es por la falta de comunicación entre los profesionales sanitarios? ¿El estado del hospital? ¿Su diseño? ¿Falta de conocimiento de las nuevas tecnologías? ¿Un diagnóstico incorrecto? ¿Medicamentos mal prescritos? Las soluciones sistémicas pretenden intervenir mejorando la eficacia e inteligencia del sistema, garantizando que todas las partes del sistema se encuentran perfectamente conectadas. Se rediseñan los hospitales para mejorar la seguridad, sobre todo para una sociedad que envejece (por ejemplo, reduciendo al mínimo los riesgos de caídas).
Pero si pasamos a un nivel de mayor profundidad y de visión del mundo, vemos que el problema puede, de hecho, ser el paradigma de la medicina occidental en sí misma: su reduccionismo, su concentración en la técnica y el rechazo de sus potenciales más moderados y holísticos. El doctor continúa muy por encima, el enfermero por debajo y el paciente aún más por debajo. La jerarquía del conocimiento es el problema de raíz a este nivel. El mero hecho de establecer una mayor formación para los profesionales sanitarios o sistemas más eficaces ignora el poder. La solución sería dar poder de decisión a los pacientes (escucharles desde su perspectiva interpretativa, sus visiones de la curación y el futuro), o cambiar de sistema sanitario (por ejemplo, los sistemas sanitarios gratuitos). No cabe duda de que la salud alternativa es el yo repudiado de la medicina moderna. Muchos investigadores están integrando estos polos opuestos, combinando la medicina moderna y antigua para obtener mejores resultados.
En el nivel del mito, el problema más profundo es la idea de que “el médico lo sabe todo”. Los pacientes renuncian a su poder cuando ven a los expertos médicos: es acceder al sistema hospitalario y los pacientes inmediatamente experimentan una regresión a sus “yoes” infantiles. Los doctores recurren a “yoes” expertos y, con unas burocracias deshumanizadas que garantizan el enfoque centrado en la eficiencia, los errores se siguen produciendo.
El CLA pretende integrar estos cuatro niveles de entendimiento (véase la tabla 1). Cada nivel es verdadero (a su nivel), internamente coherente y es necesario encontrar soluciones a cada nivel. Las intervenciones de la letanía conducen a soluciones a corto plazo, fáciles de captar, llenas de datos. Las respuestas sistémicas exigen las intervenciones de expertos en eficiencia. Se suelen producir políticas gubernamentales vinculadas a asociaciones con el sector privado. El cambio de la visión del mundo es mucho más difícil y a largo plazo, exigiendo la búsqueda de soluciones desde fuera del marco donde se ha definido la solución. Y las soluciones del mito precisan de intervenciones más profundas, al igual que toda nueva historia necesita ser contada, reconfigurando el cerebro y construyendo nuevas memorias para el individuo y la colectividad.
El CLA nos pide que trascendamos los marcos convencionales de las problemáticas. No obstante, no privilegia ningún nivel concreto. Por ejemplo, con respecto a la crisis financiera mundial (Inayatullah 2010), uno puede interpretarla estrictamente como una crisis hipotecaria o bancaria, o de una forma más amplia como la decadencia de Occidente y el surgimiento de Chindia, o incluso de una forma todavía más amplia como el final de la era industrial y la necesidad de una economía global respetuosa con el medio ambiente. Cada interpretación tiene sus propias metáforas y mitos. Si el discurso es el de la crisis hipotecaria, entonces la solución sería pasar del “Compro, luego existo” al “Vivo dentro de mis posibilidades”. De tratarse de un cambio geopolítico, entonces habría que pasar de los “límites de Occidente” al “surgimiento pacífico de Asia” (Bajpai 2012: 12-37; Inayatullah 2012). Y si realmente se tratara de un cambio fundacional, el discurso cambiaría de “crecimiento y progreso siempre” a “Gaia”: subiendo y bajando capas, y desplazándonos horizontalmente por discursos y visiones del mundo, incrementando así la riqueza del análisis.
Por lo tanto, el CLA conduce a la profundidad. Por ejemplo, en cuanto al mantenimiento del orden, conlleva pasar de la letanía de más policía para resolver los delitos y problemas de seguridad, al cambio sistémico en el que las ciudades y comunidades rediseñan su seguridad (mediante iluminación, mantenimiento del orden en las comunidades, cámaras de videovigilancia) y, posteriormente, a los cambios de la visión del mundo (Inayatullah 2012, IEET). A nivel de la visión del mundo, la estructura militar jerárquica de mantenimiento del orden se transforma en una estructura en la que la seguridad está coproducida con múltiples grupos de interés (ciudadanos, comunidades, empresas de seguridad privadas) pasando de una jerarquía de exclusión a unas culturas de inclusión más uniformes. Por último, para que cualquier cambio realizado tenga éxito, debe cuestionarse el discurso central de la “delgada línea azul”, en donde la policía es especial y todo lo sabe. El mantenimiento del orden en la comunidad o las estrategias de seguridad más amplias no lograrán tener éxito a no ser que un nuevo discurso determine quién es la policía. Sin cambios en el discurso y la visión del mundo, la concentración exclusiva en la letanía y el sistema creará una realidad donde “la cultura se desayuna la estrategia”.
El CLA también puede aplicarse al yo. Como ya han hecho participantes de todo el mundo, uno podría optar por investigar la letanía del yo (la manera de representar mi yo a los demás), el sistema del yo (¿hay un solo yo, un triple yo del ello, el ego y el superego, o bien una multiplicidad de yoes en busca de una gestalt?), la visión del mundo dominante en cuanto a la manera de organización de la mente: una democracia, una dictadura o un caos, y, por último, cuáles serían las metáforas centrales de la mente. ¿Mi mente es como una lista de tareas? ¿Una carretera con el ego de conductor? ¿Se trata de un ecosistema fluvial con muchos afluentes? El proceso del CLA empieza con el yo como tal, pasa a múltiples yoes y a continuación cuestiona la historia central (historias) del yo y trata de transformarlo (o transformarlos) (Stone 1993).
Después de profundizar en el futuro, podemos ampliarlo utilizando el quinto pilar.
Creación de alternativas
El quinto pilar se centra en los métodos que podemos usar para crear futuros alternativos. El método más importante en este pilar es la planificación de escenarios. Al igual que todo proyecto futurológico necesita haber participado en el triángulo de futuros (una exploración medioambiental), el análisis de problemáticas emergentes (aquello con posibilidades de trastocar el mapa) y el CLA (en qué consisten los discursos divergentes) también deben incluir futuros alternativos. Los escenarios son la herramienta por excelencia de los estudios del futuro, caracterizándose por abrir el presente, moldear el margen de incertidumbre, reducir el riesgo, ofrecer alternativas, crear unas mentalidades organizativas más flexibles y, todavía mejor, hacer predicciones.
Existen múltiples métodos de escenario. El primero es el de la variable múltiple, que se deriva del triángulo de futuros y del análisis de problemáticas emergentes. Basándose en las imágenes o los impulsores de las problemáticas emergentes, se crea una gama de escenarios o historias e imágenes del futuro. Partiendo de un taller sobre los futuros de la salud en línea (e-health) en Bangladés (Inayatullah y Shah 2011) basado en los impulsores de la proliferación de la tecnología móvil, los cambios demográficos (más gente joven), el papel tradicional de las mujeres y el microcrédito, el aumento de los costes del envejecimiento y los elevados costes de los hospitales, se derivaron cuatro futuros: el “Salto cualitativo”, el “Coche de salud en línea”, la “Nube 2025” y el “Copago 2025”.
En primer lugar, encontramos el “Salto cualitativo”. “En 2025, el uso inteligente de la tecnología mediante dispositivos diagnósticos de bajo coste como las aplicaciones médicas y los biosensores da lugar a una dramática transformación de la asistencia sanitaria. El sistema sanitario tradicional (occidental moderno) da un salto cualitativo. Los individuos de Bangladés tienen acceso a unas tecnologías interactivas económicas. La infraestructura de la salud en línea se desarrolla de manera ascendente. El Ministerio de Sanidad facilita los estándares y otras normas que garanticen la integración e interoperabilidad” (ibid.: 15).
En el segundo escenario, el del “Coche de salud en línea”, continuando con la metáfora del tráfico, los Sistemas de Información del Ministerio de Sanidad empujan con éxito a Bangladés hacia este futuro. Aunque todos los grupos de interés son importantes, en esta metáfora el propietario es el gobierno y el copiloto es todo el sistema de asistencia sanitaria, aunque el impulsor es el ministerio. Se desarrollan soluciones individuales y a medida para pacientes de zonas rurales y urbanas.
En el tercer futuro, el de la “Nube 2025”, la informática en la nube proporciona información sanitaria y aplicaciones diagnósticas desde cualquier lugar a todo el mundo. La “nube” es un espacio público. Sin embargo, a efectos administrativos, la salud se organiza en upazilas o subdistritos (actualmente hay quinientos en Bangladés). La red sanitaria de la nube empieza a través del seguimiento del nacimiento de cada niño de Bangladés. Una vez inscritos los nacimientos, se puede hacer un seguimiento y un control de sus ciclos de vida sanitarios, y mejorar el ámbito sanitario de las fases del ciclo vital.
En el cuarto futuro, el “Copago 2025”, la cuestión principal es el modo de pago de los sistemas futuros y su viabilidad financiera. Este futuro está centralizado, con individuos que reciben incentivos financieros para permanecer sanos por medio de desembolsos públicos. De este modo, la prevención a modo de visión del mundo se vuelve un asunto principal. Los donantes y agencias de seguros, junto con el gobierno y los profesionales sanitarios desempeñan un papel fundamental en este futuro. La información no fluye en un solo sentido, es decir educando sanitariamente a los ciudadanos, sino que lo hace en ambos sentidos por medio de los incentivos financieros y las nuevas tecnologías móviles. Los ciudadanos usan los nuevos dispositivos digitales o trabajan con asistentes sanitarios locales para mejorar su propia comprensión de sus futuros sanitarios personales a medida. Como ciudadanos adquieren más poder, mientras que los costes sanitarios tienen probabilidad de disminuir.
A pesar de la similitud considerable entre los escenarios, el nivel de autoridad del Ministerio de Sanidad resulta decisivo. La segunda diferencia se encuentra en el nivel de tecnología: ¿es la nube o son las tabletas menos integradas las que están proporcionando información a los médicos de la ciudad principal?
El segundo método de escenarios (el de la doble variable) identifica las dos incertidumbres principales y plantea alternativas en función de ellas. Este método, entre otros, ha sido desarrollado por Johan Galtung (1998, véase también el sitio Web www.transcend.org). En el estudio de caso de la salud en línea de Bangladés, se utilizó para determinar las principales incertidumbres. Los dos impulsores elegidos para este método fueron la “estructura de sistemas” y la “política”. Los extremos de la “estructura de sistemas” se clasificaron como “centralizada” (gestionada por el gobierno central) y “descentralizada” (gestionada por varios grupos de interés), mientras que los de la política se clasificaron como “política hostil”, entendida como resistente a la movilización participativa, y potenciación y “viabilidad o disponibilidad para el cambio”, entendidos como el fomento de la participación y el compromiso. Se crearon los siguientes cuatro escenarios: 1) gestionado por el ministerio, apropiado por los políticos; 2) gestionado por el ministerio, aunque los proyectos tuvieron éxito por no haber interferencia política; 3) la salud en línea de los grupos de interés del mercado y múltiples saboteadas por el favoritismo (léase, corrupción), y 4) grupos de interés del mercado y múltiples que tienen éxito gracias a la innovación tecnológica y social de los participantes. El gobierno desempeña principalmente la función de determinar los estándares.
En este proyecto, los escenarios desarrollados en el método de variables múltiples se sometieron a ensayo mediante el método de doble variable.
El método de doble variable resulta excelente para desarrollar estrategias. No obstante, es un método crucial para debatir las variables esenciales. Su punto débil es que no desarrolla ningún escenario atípico.
El tercer método de escenarios lo desarrolló James Dator, articulando los siguientes arquetipos de escenarios (Dator 1979):
  • Crecimiento constante: donde se mejoran las condiciones actuales: más productos, más carreteras, más tecnología y una mayor población. El incremento del crecimiento se considera la solución a cualquier problema.
  •  Colapso: este futuro se deriva de los fallos del “Crecimiento constante”. Las contradicciones son demasiado grandes: entre la economía y la naturaleza, entre los hombres y las mujeres, entre la economía especulativa y la real, entre los enfoques religioso, secular y posmoderno, y entre la tecnología y la cultura.
  •  Estado estable: este futuro pretende atraer el crecimiento y encontrar un equilibrio en la economía y con la naturaleza. Se trata de una sociedad equilibrada, más moderada y justa. La comunidad resulta decisiva en este tipo de futuro. El Estado estable supone un regreso tanto a la naturaleza como al pasado. Aquí lo primero son los valores humanos. El problema en este caso suele ser el crecimiento ilimitado (ciudades, población en expansión y tecnología).
  •   Transformación: este futuro pretende cambiar las suposiciones básicas de los otros tres tipos de futuro. La transformación ocurre bien a través de un cambio tecnológico drástico (por ejemplo, la inteligencia artificial elimina la burocracia y muchas formas de gobierno, la genética modifica la naturaleza de la naturaleza) o un cambio espiritual (los humanos cambian su conciencia por medio de la experiencia de la trascendencia profunda).
Este enfoque es fácil de utilizar, ya que se incluyen todas las suposiciones del futuro: uno solo tiene que rellenar los datos del escenario de la nación, institución u organización en cuestión.
Desarrollado por Peter Schwartz (1995, 1996) de la empresa Global Business Network, el cuarto modelo de escenarios se centra en las cuestiones organizativas. La estructura del escenario se compone de cuatro variables: el mejor de los casos (a lo que aspira la organización), el peor de los casos (aquel en el que todo sale mal); valor atípico (un futuro inesperado basado en una problemática emergente perturbadora) y negocio típico (sin cambios). Lo mejor es emplear este modelo al trabajar en una organización concreta con una cultura compartida.
En un taller impartido recientemente para una universidad malaya, el escenario del negocio típico supuso una financiación por parte del gobierno con un programa desarrollado por los profesores. En el peor de los casos, debido a la globalización, la universidad se vuelve irrelevante y cierra. En el mejor de los casos, la universidad se convierte en la universidad técnica preferida, el MIT de la nación, con la participación de comunidad, industria, profesores universitarios, el personal y los alumnos como grupos de interés. En el escenario atípico, la universidad deja de ser gestionada gubernamental y académicamente, para pasar a ser más a la carta, gestionada por los alumnos.
La quinta técnica de escenario presenta cuatro dimensiones: la preferida (el mundo que deseamos), la repudiada (el mundo que rechazamos o somos incapaces de negociar), la integrada (donde lo poseído y lo repudiado están unidos de un modo complejo) y, por último, lo atípico (el futuro fuera de estas categorías). Continuando con el ejemplo de la universidad malaya anteriormente mencionado, la dimensión preferida sería la integración de universidad e industria, que es vista por muchos como “el Camino a seguir”. La dimensión integrada sería el individuo y la competencia, o los “Caminos separados”. La dimensión integrada sería “Nuestro camino”, donde uno más uno son tres. La industria y la universidad son interdependientes, y mediante esa necesidad mutua crean un nuevo camino. En el escenario atípico, se produce un colapso económico, a medida que todo el mundo pasa al modo de supervivencia. En este caso, nos encontraríamos ante “Ningún camino” (véase la tabla 2).
Transformación del futuro
El último pilar es el de la Transformación. Aquí hay tres métodos cruciales: 1) pronóstico; 2) retrospectiva, y 3) método Transcend para resolver los conflictos que puedan aparecer entre visiones. En la transformación, el futuro se restringe a lo preferido. ¿Cuál es el futuro deseado por los individuos? ¿Cuál es el futuro deseado por las organizaciones, ciudades y naciones?
Las visiones y el pronóstico resultan fundamentales en este ámbito. Las visiones funcionan arrastrando a las personas. Apor tan a los individuos y grupos una sensación de lo posible. Además inspiran la nobleza que cada persona oculta en su interior pidiendo a los individuos que sacrifiquen el corto plazo por el largo plazo, por el bien común. Por último, ayudan a equiparar los objetivos individuales con los objetivos institucionales. Como defiende Fred Polak en su obra The Image of the Future (1973), una organización, nación o civilización que no tenga una visión persuasiva del futuro y la convicción de que la acción es posible, acabará por decaer.
Para desarrollar una visión disponemos de tres métodos: analíticamente mediante escenarios, recurriendo al cuestionamiento y a través de la visualización creativa.
En el proceso mediante escenarios, el futuro preferido constituye el mejor de los casos. En el proceso de cuestionamiento, se interroga a los individuos en cuanto a la naturaleza del día preferido en su vida del futuro. Se les podría preguntar: ¿qué ocurre después de levantarte?, ¿cómo sería tu casa?, ¿qué tipo de tecnologías utilizas?, ¿con quién vives?, ¿qué diseño tiene tu casa?, ¿qué tipos de materiales de construcción se han empleado?, ¿tienes algún trabajo?, ¿qué tal tu trabajo?, ¿qué comes? Este tipo de preguntas fuerza a los individuos a pensar más detalladamente en el mundo en el que les gustaría vivir.
El futuro preferido también puede discernirse a través de un proceso de visualización creativa. En dicho proceso, se pide a los individuos que cierren los ojos y adopten una aptitud tranquila. Partiendo de aquí, los individuos darán pasos mentalmente en dirección a un seto o pared (la cantidad de pasos dependerá de la cantidad de años que deseen avanzar en el futuro). El futuro preferido se encontraría encima del seto. Los individuos caminan hacia ese futuro. El mediador les pide detalles del tipo: ¿quién está allí?, ¿cómo se presenta el futuro?, ¿qué puedes ver, oler, oír, tocar y saborear? Este ejercicio articula el futuro desde el lado derecho del cerebro (que es más visual) permitiéndonos acceder al inconsciente.
A continuación, se triangulan los tres métodos de pronóstico (el escenario analítico, el cuestionamiento y la visualización creativa) para desarrollar una visión más completa del futuro.
Retrospectiva
A continuación se puede realizar una retrospectiva de la visión. La retrospectiva, desarrollada por Elise Boulding (Boulding y Boulding 1995), funciona trasladando a los individuos al futuro deseado, o a cualquier escenario en particular como, por ejemplo, el peor de los casos. A continuación, decidimos preguntar, en el caso del futuro deseado, ¿qué ocurrió en los últimos veinte años para llegar a la situación actual? ¿Qué tendencias y eventos originaron el presente actual? La retrospectiva lo que hace es rellenar el espacio que queda entre el hoy (el futuro) y el pasado. El hecho de hacerlo así, hace que el futuro resulte mucho más alcanzable. A continuación, se pueden determinar las medidas necesarias para alcanzar el futuro deseado. Esto puede hacerse por medio de un plan o adoptando medidas de aprendizaje activo, donde el proceso de experimentación empieza a crear el futuro deseado. Esto puede ser una estrategia de transición presupuestada o una reconversión de envergadura.
La retrospectiva también se puede utilizar para evitar el escenario del peor de los casos. Una vez desarrolladas las medidas que conducen al escenario del peor de los casos, se pueden determinar las estrategias para evitar ese escenario.
Conflicto entre visiones
¿Qué ocurre cuando surge un conflicto entre diferentes visiones del futuro? El método Transcend de Johan Galtung (1998) (figura 3) supone una excelente forma de avanzar (véase www.transcend.org). Este método no se centra en el compromiso, o aún peor, en la retirada, sino en buscar soluciones beneficiosas para todas las partes. Para ello, es necesario explicar detalladamente todos los asuntos que se han cuestionado en las dos visiones. Posteriormente, y a través de un proceso de lluvia de ideas en el que se creen alternativas, pueden surgir nuevas formas de integrar las visiones. En un estudio de caso de una ciudad, un grupo de interés apostaba por una ciudad sostenible y ecológica, mientras que otro grupo defendía una ciudad mucho más moderna, internacional y sofisticada. Por medio del método Transcend, los defensores de la ecología comprendieron que su modelo de ciudad resultaría aburrido. De este modo, se dieron cuenta de que la visión sofisticada era una forma de recuperar ese aspecto renegado de sus personalidades, pero también que la dimensión moderna de la ciudad podría ayudarles a innovar. Los modernos comprendieron que sin tener la sostenibilidad como principio orientador no se produciría ningún avance para nadie: cada uno de los aspectos de la visión necesitaba de los demás. Partiendo de este método, se articuló una visión más integradora a partir de la cual se podrían desarrollar las estrategias.
Cuestionando el futuro
El proceso de los Seis Pilares también puede reducirse a varias preguntas simples que se detallan a continuación. Estas preguntas constituyen un método en sí mismas: una forma de cuestionar el futuro. Pueden utilizarse para ayudar tanto a los individuos como a las organizaciones a emprender la transformación.
  • ¿Cuál es el historial de la cuestión? ¿Qué eventos y tendencias han creado el presente?
  • ¿Cuáles son sus pronósticos del futuro? De continuar las tendencias actuales, ¿cómo será el futuro?
  • ¿Cuáles son los supuestos ocultos del futuro pronosticado por usted? ¿Hay algo que se dé por sentado (en cuanto a género, naturaleza, tecnología o cultura)?
  • ¿Qué alternativas habría al futuro pronosticado o temido por usted? De cambiar algunos de sus supuestos, ¿qué alternativas surgirían?
  • ¿Cómo es su futuro deseado?
  • ¿Cómo ha llegado hasta aquí? ¿Que medidas adoptó para comprender el presente?
La última pregunta se basa en el CLA:
¿Existe algún discurso de apoyo o historia? De no ser así, establezca una metáfora o relato que pueda ofrecer apoyo cognitivo y emotivo para comprender el futuro deseado.
Para concluir, los estudios futurológicos (así como la investigación futurológica) además de tener que ver con pronosticar, interpretar y criticar el futuro, también se preocupan por crear no solo la posibilidad, sino la realidad de mundos alternativos, futuros alternativos. A través de los métodos estructurados, aparecen nuevas visiones y estrategias. El enfoque de los Seis Pilares proporciona un marco conceptual y metodológico para este viaje.
  • Los estudios futurológicos crean futuros alternativos que convierten suposiciones básicas en problemáticas. Mediante el cuestionamiento del futuro, el análisis de problemáticas emergentes y los escenarios, lo que se pretende es salir del presente y crear la posibilidad de nuevos futuros.
  • Los Seis Pilares proporcionan una teoría de pensamiento futurológico vinculada a métodos y herramientas, y desarrollada a través de la praxis. Los pilares son los siguientes: planificación, anticipación, temporización, profundización, creación de alternativas y transformación.

Bibliografía
Amara, Roy. 1981. “The Futures Field”, The Futurist (febrero, abril y junio).
Bajpai, Arunonday. 2012. “The ‘Rise of Asia’ Thesis”, World Affairs 16, 2: 12-37.
Bauwens, Michael. http://p2pfoundation.net/Michel_Bauwens. Consultado el 2 de agosto de 2012.
Bell, Wendell. 1996. The Foundations of Futures Studies Human Science for a New Era: History Purposes, and Knowledge. New Brunswick (Nueva Jersey): Transaction Publishers.
Boulding, Elise, y Kenneth Boulding. 1995. The Future: Images and Processes. Londres: Sage.
Brice, Jenny. 2004. “The Virus Analogy”, Journal of Futures Studies 9, 2: 77-82.
Candy, Stuart. 2010. The Futures of Everyday Life. Tesis doctoral. Honolulu: Department of Political Science, University of Hawaii.
Comte, Auguste. [1875] 1974. Positive Philosophy. Londres: Trubner.
Dator, James. 1979. “The Futures of Cultures and Cultures of the Future”, en Marsella et al., Perspectives on Cross Cultural Psychology. Nueva York: Academic Press.
Eisler, Riane. 1987. The Chalice and the Blade. Our History, Our Future. San Francisco: Harper and Row.
Eisler, Riane. 1996. Scared Pleasure: Sex, Myth, and the Politics of the Body. San Francisco: Harper Collins.
Elgin, Duane. 2000. Promise Ahead: A Vision of Hope and Action for Humanity’s Future. Nueva York: William Morrow and Company.
Foucault, Michel. 1980. Power/Knowledge. Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972-1977. Edición de Colin Gordon. Nueva York: Pantheon.
Foucault, Michel. 1982. The Archaeology of Knowledge and The Discourse on Language. Nueva York: Pantheon.
Foucault, Michel. 1994. The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences. Nueva York: Vintage Books.
Galtung, Johan. 1975-1988. Essays in Peace Research. Vols. 1-6. Copenhague: Christian Ejlers.
Galtung, Johan, y Sohail Inayatullah. 1997. Macrohistory and Macrohistorians. Westport, Connecticut: Praeger.
Harmon, Willis. 1988. Global Mind Change. Indiana: Knowledge Systems.
Hayward, Peter, y Joseph Voros. 2006. “Playing The Neohumanist Game”, en Sohail Inayatullah, Marcus Bussey e Ivana Milojevic (eds.), Neohumanist Educational Futures: Liberating the pedagogical intellect. Tamsui: Tamkang University: 283-296.
Henderson, Hazel. 1996. Building a Win-Win World: Life Beyond Global Economic Warfare. San Francisco: Berret-Koehler.
Hiltunen, Elina. 2011. “Crowdsourcing The Future: The Foresight Process at Finpro”, Journal of Futures Studies 16, 1: 189-196.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 1990. “Deconstructing and Reconstructing the Future”, Futures 22, 2: 115-141.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 1998. “Causal Layered Analysis: Poststructuralism as Method”, Futures 30, 8: 815-830.
Inayatullah, Sohail (ed.). 2000. “The Views of Futurists”, en The Knowledge Base of Futures Studies. Vol. 4. CD-ROM. Melbourne: Futures Study Centre.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2002. Questioning the Future: Futures Studies, Action Learning and Organizational Transformation. Tamsui: Tamkang University.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2002. “Reductionism or Layered Complexity: The Futures of Futures Studies”, Futures 34, 3-4: 295-302.
Inayatullah, Sohail (ed.). 2004. The Causal Layered Analysis Reader: Theory and Case Studies of an Integrative and Transformative Methodology. Tamsui: Tamkang University.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2007. Questioning the Future: Methods and Tools for Organizational and Societal Transformation. Tamsui: Tamkang University.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2008. “Six Pillars: Futures Thinking for Transforming”, Foresight 10, 1: 4-28.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2010. “Emerging World Scenario Triggered by the Global Financial Crisis”, World Affairs: The Journal of International Issues 14, 3: 48-69.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2012a. “Alternative Scenario for Asia”, World Affairs 16, 2: 38-51.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2012b. “Alternative Futures of Crime and Policing”. Institute Of Ethics And Emerging Technologies, http://ieet.org/index.php/IEET/more/Inayatullah20120719. Consultado el 7 de agosto de 2012.
Inayatullah, Sohail. 2012. “Popular Culture and Punishment”, Scenario (febrero): 56-58.
Inayatullah, Sohail, y Ali Shah. 2011. E-health Scenarios and Visions for Bangladesh. Informe presentado al Ministerio de Sanidad, Gobierno de Bangladés, octubre.
Kelly, Patricia. 2008. Towards Globo Sapiens: Transforming Learners in Higher Education. Róterdam: Sense Publishers.
Khaldun, Ibn. 1967. The Muqaddimah: An Introduction to History. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
László, Ervin. 1988. “Footnotes to a History of the Future”, Futures 20, 5: 479-492.
László, Ervin. 2006. Science and the Reenchantment of the Cosmos. Rochester, Vermont: Inner Traditions.
Linstone, H. 1985. “What I Have Learned: the Need for Multiple Perspectives”, Futures Research Quarterly (primavera): 47-61.
Lovelock, James. 2006. The Revenge of Gaia. Camberwell, Victoria: Penguin Allen Lane.
Markley, O. W., y Willis W. Harman (eds.). 1982. Changing Images of Man. Elmsford, Nueva York: Pergamon Press.
Masini, Elenora. 1983. Visions of Desirable Societies. Oxford: Pergamon Press.
Masini, Elenora. 1993. Why Futures Studies? Londres: Grey Seal.
McLuhan, Marshall. 1964. Understanding Media: the Extensions of Man. Nueva York: McGraw-Hill.
Molitor, Graham. 2003. The Power to Change the World: The Art of Forecasting. Potomoc, Maryland: Public Policy Forecasting.
Nandy, Ashis. 1987. Traditions, Tyranny and Utopias. Nueva Delhi: Oxford University Press.
Pareto, Vilfredo. 1968. The Rise and Fall of the Elites. Introducción de Hans Zetterburg. Nueva Jersey: The Bedminster Press.
Polak, Fred. 1973. The Image of the Future. Ámsterdam: Elsevier Publishing Company.
Ramos, José. 2006. “Toward a Politics of Possibility: Changing Shifts in Utopian Imagination Through The World Social Forum Process”, Journal of Futures Studies, 11, 2: 1-14.
Ramos, José. “Foresight in a Network Era: PeerProducing Alternative Futures”, en Journal of Futures Studies 17, 2 (próxima aparición).
Robertson, James. 2000. Creating New Money: A Monetary Reform For The Information Age. Londres: New Economics Foundation.
Sardar, Ziauddin (ed.). 1999. Rescuing All of Our Futures: The Futures of Futures Studies. Londres: Adamantine Press.
Sarkar, Prabhat Rainjan. 1987. A Few Problems Solved. Vols. 1-7. Calcuta: Ananda Marga Publications.
Sarkar, Prabhat Rainjan. 1991. Microvita in a Nutshell. Calcuta: Ananda Marga Publications.
Saul, Peter. 2001. “This Way to the Future”, Journal of Futures Studies 6, 1: 107-120.
Schwartz, Peter. 1995. ‘‘Scenarios: the Future of the Future”, Wired (octubre).
Schwartz, Peter. 1996. The Art of the Long View. Nueva York: Doubleday.
Shapiro, Michael. 1992. Reading the Postmodern Polity: Political Theory as Textual Practice. Minneapolis, Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press.
Sorokin, Pitirim. 1957. Dynamics of Social Change. Boston, Massachusetts: Porter Sargent.
Spencer, Herbert. 1973. “The Evolution of Societies”, en Amitai Etzioni y Eva Etzioni-Halevy (eds.), Social Change. Nueva York: Basic Books.
Spengler, Oswald. 1972. The Decline of the West. Nueva York: Alfred Knopf.
Stone, Hal, y Sidra Stone. 1993. Embracing your Inner Critic: Turning Self-criticism into a Creative Asset. Nueva York: HarperOne.
Taleb, Nassim. 2010. The Black Swan, 2.ª ed. Nueva York: Penguin.
Toffler, Alvin. 1970. Toffler, Future Shock. Nueva York: Random House.
Toffler, Alvin. 1981. The Third Wave. Nueva York: Bantam Books.
Tolle, Eckhart. 2003. A New Earth: Awakening to your Life’s Purpose. Nueva York: Penguin.
Toynbee, Arnold. 1972. A Study of History. Londres: Oxford University Press.
Voros, Joseph. 2003. “A Generic Foresight Process Framework”, Foresight 5, 3: 10-21.
Watson, B. 1958. Ssu-Ma Chien: Grand Historian of China. Nueva York: Columbia University Press.